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Edward Clay

Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU) is China’s leading Joint Venture university. Founded in 2006, it now has almost 15,000 students in China; and another 3,500 in Liverpool completing degrees. It plans to grow to about 27,000 students by 2025. The strengths of the university are in Science and Technology, as well as some professional subjects like Architecture and Business. There are currently 865 academic staff, about half of whom are not citizens of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The language of instruction, committees, and administrative work at XJTLU is English.

The university is located in the Higher Education Town of Suzhou Industrial Park (SIP), well-connected via nearby airports to cities such as Hong Kong, Seoul, Tokyo, and Taipei, and via high-speed rail to other major cities in China, including nearby Shanghai. SIP is a significant growth zone, including operations run by more than one-fifth of the Fortune 500 top global companies. Greater Suzhou is now the fourth largest concentration of economic activity in China in terms of GDP, and the SIP has been on the receiving end of both private and public investments into innovation and R&D.

Post to start: 1 September 2020

Deadline for applications: 4 January 2020

For more information, click here

Clear and accessible, this textbook provides a step-by-step guide to textual analysis for beginning translators and translation students. Covering a variety of text types, including business letters, recipes, and museum guides in six languages (Chinese, English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish), this book presents authentic, research-based materials to support translation among any of these languages.

Translating Texts will provide beginning translators with greater text awareness, a critical skill for professional translators. Including discussions of the key theoretical texts underlying this text-centred approach to translation and sample rubrics for (self) assessment, this coursebook also provides easy instructions for creating additional corpora for other text types and in other languages.

Ideal for both language-neutral and language-specific classroom settings, this is an essential text for undergraduate and graduate-level programs in modern languages and translation.

For more information, click here

The translation industry is booming, but this is not replicated by research within this field. The Research Group in Computational Linguistics (RGCL) seeks to become an international leader in this area by proposing the next generation of Translation Technology, which has substantial industry-wide applications. By appointing a Senior Lecturer in the area of translation technology, RGCL will be able to strengthen the work it is already carrying out and produce new innovation. You will be expected to produce high quality research, contribute to attracting external income, seek industrial collaborations, teach at Masters level and supervise PhD students.

You will hold a first degree in a relevant discipline, together with a PhD (or equivalent) in a field related to machine translation, translation memories or translation technologies, and will have completed work at postdoctoral research level at a university, research institute or in a related part of the private sector in the UK or abroad. You will be proficient in a range of subject-specific skills and ideally will have extensive experience in site-based research settings. You will be able to demonstrate the ability to work independently to develop new research objectives and proposals including contributing to the securing of external funding and collaborative projects.

Deadline for applications: 1 January 2020

For more information, click here

The emerging area of field and workplace research in translation studies focuses on research on translation and interpreting in the very places where they occur, i.e. embedded in specific temporal, spatial and organisational environments. The International Conference on Field Research on Translation and Interpreting (FIRE-TI) seeks to bring together researchers who study translation and interpreting (T&I) practices, processes or networks in situ using a variety of different (inter)disciplinary approaches, e.g. from sociological, cognitive, anthropological or ergonomic perspectives. The primary objective of the conference is to create a common reflection space for T&I field and workplace research where experts can share insights into the diversity and complexity of translation and interpreting practices. In doing so, it also seeks to bring to the fore those particular aspects that are hard to reconstruct through product analyses or in a laboratory setting.

The conference will provide a forum for researchers with an interest in the situational embeddedness of translation and interpreting processes to present and discuss their approaches, methods and insights.

The contributions will discuss what kinds of concepts and theoretical approaches are needed to describe the investigated practices. What difference does the situatedness and embeddedness of translation and interpreting make for our descriptions of practices, processes and networks? What shapes the dynamics of the T&I fields and language industry today and how does this challenge the current conceptual boundaries in translation studies? How do new organisational forms influence practices and practitioners? How do working professionals and language industry stakeholders but also non-professional and amateur interpreters and translators perceive their situation and activities?

Deadline for submissions: 12 July 2020

For more information, click here

AUC/School of Continuing Education is proud to launch the 2nd Localization, Translation and Interpreting Conference under the theme:

"Going Global: Business, Community and Education" to be held in AUC Tahrir Campus, April 1st and 2nd, 2020. 

The topics of the conference this year are:

  • Translation and Interpretation in global contexts
  • Instruction and practice of Translation and Interpretation
  • How can talents gear up for the market?
  • How can businesses provide services globally?

The conference invites contributions from professionals and academics to engage in discussions reflecting on market requirements, efficient professional training, and the role collaboration between business and academia could play to bring new solutions and address them.

Deadline for submissions: December 31 2019

For more information, click here

Current Trends in Translation Teaching and Learning E (CTTL E) is a double-blind refereed open access journal that explores a variety of issues related to translation teaching and learning. We seek qualitative and quantitative research articles that are relevant to this subject. The publication is indexed in the ESCI of the Web of Science and is available via EBSCO and is free online via our website. The length of papers should be around 2500 to 6000 words. 

The deadline for submission of articles is March 1, 2020.

For more information, click here

Wednesday, 11 December 2019 15:07

TransLinguaTech Journal

Dongguk University Translation Studies Research Institute is launching peer-reviewed journal TransLinguaTech which focuses on translation, language and relevant technologies.

The rapid development of machine translation and other language technologies presents fundamental challenges to researchers and practitioners in translation, calling for reconsideration of various aspects of translation such as its definition, agent, object and method. However, there are few platforms dedicated to the issues brought about by the challenge. TransLinguaTech aims at providing a venue dedicated to such discussion, welcoming manuscripts on translation, language and relevant technologies.

Deadline for submissions: 15 Jan 2020

For more information, click here

Editors: Evangelos Kourdis and Susan Petrilli

It is our belief that the broadening of the notion of text has largely come about thanks to contributions from semiotic studies, according to a movement that has brought translation studies closer to semiotics. The relevancy of general sign studies to translation theory and practice has helped translation studies to move away from the verbo-centric dogmatism of the sixties and seventies when only systems ruled by double articulation were recognized the dignity of language (Eco, 1976). As Torop (2014) argues, “text is what we understand in culture and it is through the text that we understand something of culture”.

Thanks to our primary modelling system or language (“language as modelling” which conditions communication and translation through the great multiplicity of different verbal and nonverbal “languages” with which human beings enter into contact with each other, signify, interpret, and respond to each other), understanding in culture occurs through texts of the semiotic order, verbal and nonverbal texts, multimodal texts, in the unending chain of responses among texts, engendered in the relation among speakers and listeners, readers and writers. Texts are created, interpreted and re-created in dialogic relations among participants in communication. Their sense and meaning is modeled, developed and amplified through the processes of transmutation ensuing from and at once promoting the cultural spaces of encounter.

Torop (2014) argues that the text is located in a wide intersemiotic space, and that the analysis of a text demands investigation of its creation, construction, and reception: the text is a process in intersemiotic space. If we accept Marais’ (2018) argument that all socio-cultural phenomena have a translation dimension, it is difficult to disagree with Gentzler’s (2001) observation that translation theory can quickly enmesh the researcher in the entire intersemiotic network of language and culture, one touching on all disciplines and discourses. Nor could it be otherwise if we consider that the material of language and culture is sign material and that the sign as such is in translation. This means to say that to be this sign here the sign must be other, to be this text here the text must be other. The signifying specificity of a text develops in translational processes among signs and interpretants, utterers and listeners, writers and readers, across semiosic spheres and disciplines, across intersemiotic, or transemiotic spaces in the signifying universe, verbal and nonverbal.

The notion of text has evolved significantly thanks to contributions not only from the Tartu-Moscow School of Semiotics but also from the French School, with important implications for the question of translatability, a fundamental property and specific characteristic of all semiotic systems – as stated, the “sign is in translation”. It ensues that translatability subtends the semantic process (Greimas & Courtés 1993), and with Charles Morris (1938) interpreted by Ferruccio Rossi-Landi (1954, 1975, 1992), we know that meaning not only concerns the semantic dimension of semiosis, but also the syntactical and the pragmatic dimensions. With reference to interlingual translation, as Petrilli (2003) claims, translatability indicates an open relation between a text in the original and its translation. In this volume of Punctum, we will investigate this open relation.

Deadline for abstracts: 15 December 2019

For more information, click here

Adaptation

Special Issue: Intersemiotic Translation as Adaptation, Edited by Vasso Giannakopoulou and Deborah Cartmell

Volume 12, Issue 3, December 2019

For more information, click here

Following the 1st International Conference on Intersemiotic Translation, held in November 2017 at the University of Cyprus, this conference aims to address the theoretical and practical challenges that the shift away from the logocentric to increasingly intersemiotic, intermedial and transmedial culture poses for the relevant fields, which are consequently forced to reexamine their concepts, methods as well as objects of study. Concurrently with the developments that have led many disciplines (translation studies, adaptation studies, intermediality studies, semiotics, among others) to look at processes and products that cross media borders, we have also witnessed the appearance of a plethora of concepts describing such phenomena: from rewritings and refractions to intermedial translations, adaptations and appropriations to remediations, transmediations, transformations, transcreations, and (medial) transgressions, to name but a few. All these terms acknowledge the radical transformations that can occur when texts produce offshoots that transgress the borders of the language, genre, medium or platform of the original text. Recognizing that all terms have their different backgrounds and sometimes conflicting usages, this conference has chosen as one of its key terms the notion of ‘transmedia’ – not necessarily in any one of its specialised senses as used, for instance, by Henry Jenkins in the context of transmedia storytelling or by Peeter Torop and Maarja Ojamaa, who regard transmediality as the complex interrelations between texts in the mental space of culture – but rather as an umbrella term. We foreground ‘transmedia’– with its prefix trans- meaning ‘across’, ‘beyond’, ‘through’ – as a marker to highlight the ubiquitous processes and phenomena of media crossovers that share some common features (such as fictional world, character, plot).

It is our understanding that with such high concentration of transmedial practices and concepts currently underway in culture and in academia, the time is ripe to see this as a general ‘turn’ not to be ignored. Although related to the ‘technological turn’ of the 2000s in translation studies as described by Michael Cronin, the ‘transmedial turn’ goes beyond the technological one: while the latter is defined by the changes in technology, the term ‘transmediality’ foregrounds a major operational logic of culture that has become especially explicit in this era of new media developments. At the same time, the notion of transmediality can shed light and contribute to the study of the respective practices of the past prior to the more recent technological changes. The aim of this conference is to look at the various transmedial practices historically and in comparison with the changes that have taken place during the last decades as a result of an explosive surge in intermedial and transmedial practices. The discussion will seek to investigate potential ways to account for these changes theoretically and map the implications they might have on the level of practice. The conference intends to bring together scholars from various disciplines, which over the recent years have moved extensively beyond their traditional borders in terms of both their study objects and their approaches. We hope that such a joint effort will offer valuable insights to the conceptualisations of transmedial practices across different cultural contexts at different points in time and bridge theoretical as well as methodological gaps.

We would like to open up the discussion on the following:

- The movement of texts across different times and different media: from intertextuality to intermediality, from intermediality to transmediality; 

- The analysis and mapping of transmedial processes and products;

- Transmedial practices in translation and adaptation history;

- Theoretical models and methods to account for transmedial phenomena across disciplines;

- The potential to find common ground on terminology in media-centred discourses across disciplines;

- The concepts of ‘translation’ and ‘adaptation’ revisited in the framework of transmediality;

- Translators, adaptors, refractors: the network of agents involved in the production of transmedia;

- Transmedial entanglements of literature, theatre, film etc. and their influence on the conceptualisation and practice of translation and adaptation;

- Changes in the distinction between professional/non-professional and individual/ collective in transmedial practices;

- Power relations and ethics in transmedial practices.  

1 March 2020: Deadline for presentation proposals

For more information, click here

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