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Tuesday, 26 December 2017 18:07

MULTILINGUAL HUMOUR IN TRANSLATION

SPECIAL ISSUE - MULTILINGUAL HUMOUR IN TRANSLATION

Guest Editor: Dr. Margherita Dore
University of Rome “La Sapienza”
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Calls for Papers

International Conference

Protest and Dissent in Translation and Culture

organized by

Department of Anglophone Cultures and Literatures

University of Social Sciences and Humanities (SWPS)

Warsaw, 11-13 May 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

Though dissent and protest seem to be strongly linked with politics and with political actions, the range of their senses and uses is much broader and, as Amit Chaudhuri has noticed, dissent is inscribed in the very idea of the literary which, "in its resistance to interpretation, is a peculiar species of dissent." The common ground of protest and dissent is, very generally, a disagreement with what is, and an expression of the necessity of some change which seems to be standing behind the very gestures of dissension or protestation. This expression may take various forms and make use of various modalities coming from different cultures, states and places. Protest and dissent may sometimes be individual gestures, as seems to be the case with Melville's Bartleby's famous "I would prefer not to", though the outdoor reading of "Bartleby, the Scrivener" organized by Occupy Wall Street supporters at Zuccotti Park in New York in November 2011 was an event which renarrated the story as "resonating quite well with the mission of the OWS protest" because it not only questioned the assumed hierarchy and expressed the strength of passive resistance, but also because it was set on Wall Street. Dominance and resistance seem to be inevitably speaking through various narratives and stories we live by, the stories which are narrated and renarrated, framed and reframed in different social, political and language communities and realities, through different media and means, and translated into different contexts and languages. The notion of framing, Mona Baker claims in "Reframing Conflict in Translation", allows us "to see translational choices not merely as local linguistic challenges but as contributing directly to the narratives that shape our social world". The ways in which we name, rename, or label events, groups of people, even places have implications in the real world and may help us realize that the world is not made up of universally accepted norms, but that we also partake in negotiating its construction, its changing meanings and senses. Protest and dissent do not necessarily have to be an incentive to a revolutionary change, to a shift of the dominant, but may testify to there being what Edward Said called simply "something beyond the reach of dominating systems", something which limits power and "hobbles" it also through translatological resistance to finality.

We invite papers looking at protest and dissent from different theoretical and methodological perspectives (Translation Studies, Literary Criticism, Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Discourse Analysis, Feminist and Gender Studies, Queer Theory, Philosophy, Sociology, History of Ideas, Colonial and Postcolonial Studies), papers not only theorizing protest and dissent but also papers engaged in broadly understood disagreement, disapproval, critique or resistance, potentials of conflict management and/or the educational and pedagogical dimensions of dissent. We also invite papers showing how narratives of dissent and protest (novels, poems, stories, histories, films, news, press articles, protest songs ...) are renarrated/translated in different social and political contexts and the ways in which translators' choices may be oriented or disoriented. If Jacques Rancière is right saying that "the essence of politics is the manifestation of dissensus as the presence of two worlds in one", then translation, as an inevitably divided activity, may be a kind of discourse which reveals that oneness may be one of those ideas which harbour consensual dominance and the end of politics, the end of dissensual plurality and the beginning of the police which, in different disguises, finds these days its way to the streets of numerous places of the world.

We suggest the following, broad, thematic areas as issues for disputes and highly probable clashes of ideas:

Rhetoric(s) of protest and dissent
Narrating/renarrating protest and dissent
Dissent and protest in intercultural contexts
Dissent and protest in the culture of global/local politics
Translating protest
Translating dissent
Translation-power-resistance
Empowerment and translation
Resisting power/power of resistance
Discourses of dissent and protest
Discursive strategies of protest and dissent
Discursive analyses of protest and dissent
Pedagogy/ies of dissent
Manipulating protest and dissent

Protest and persuasion
Conflict/protest/dissent
Translating conflict
Literature(s) of protest
Protest/dissent and media
Protest/attack/defense
Protesters/dissenters as friends
Protester/dissenters as enemies
Good guys and bad guys
Protest and activism
Activating/de-activating protest and dissent
Global dissents and/in translation
Solidarity in translation
Translating collectives/collective translations

Keynote speakers:
Professor Mona Baker (University of Manchester)
Professor Ben Dorfman (Aalborg University)
Professor Hanna Komorowska (University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw)
Professor Tadeusz Rachwał (University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw)

Venue: University of Social Sciences and Humanities, ul. Chodakowska 19/31, Warsaw, Poland.

Proposals for 20-minute papers (ca 250 words) should be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 20 February 2017. We also encourage panel proposals (comprised of 3 to 4 papers, and an additional 100-150 words explaining how they are interlinked in addressing the panel theme). 
Notification of acceptance will be sent by 28 February 2017.
The deadline for registration and payment of the conference fee: 31 March 2017.

The conference fee is 550 PLN | 130 EUR | 140 USD for all participants.

Conference organizers: Dr. Agnieszka Pantuchowicz and Dr. Anna Warso.

Conference website: https://portal.swps.edu.pl/web/protest-and-dissent-in-translation-and-culture 

Published in Calls for Papers

 

 

CULTUS 10 : Multilingualism, Lingua Franca or What? (2nd call)

 

Call for Abstracts: 20 December, 2016          Call for papers: 1 April, 2017

Cultus 10 will begin with a conversation with renowned linguist, comparative literature and translation theorist Professor Susan Bassnett. The issue will focus on multilingual situations, and how the language issue is resolved. How tenable is the solution and what are the consequences? This brings politics and power into the question, as well as the short and long term costs of the choices made. 

We welcome papers that address issues related to the following themes with a focus on translation:

- Multilingualism power and empowerment

- Politics and power in language

- Use of a lingua franca in professional encounters

- Professional practice, discourse and the new media

- The role of machine translation in professional practice

Published in Calls for Papers

 

Call for Abstracts: 20 December, 2016      Call for papers: 1 April, 2017

Cultus 10 will begin with a conversation with renowned linguist, comparative literature and translation theorist Professor Susan Bassnett. The issue will focus on multilingual situations, and how the language issue is resolved. How tenable is the solution and what are the consequences? This brings politics and power into the question, as well as the short and long term costs of the choices made. Submissions are welcomed on the following themes with a focus on translation:

-       Multilingualism power and empowerment

-       Politics and power in language

-       Use of a lingua franca in professional encounters

-       Professional practice, discourse and the new media

-       The role of machine translation in professional practice

Published in Calls for Papers

The II International Conference on Translation, Ideology and Gender
“In Sickness and in Health”
3-4 November 2016
University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain
http://translationgender.wix.com/translationgenderii

 

After the success of the 1st edition, The II International Conference on Translation, Ideology and Gender aims to continue with the fruitful discussions that emerged in the first encounter. The conference invites proposals addressing issues related to the representation of gender in translated discourses and the ideological implications that the shifts of meaning may bear on female image construction. In addition, in line with its subtitle “In Sickness and in Health”, particular attention will be paid to research promoting debate around the representation of gender in the health sciences. The conference stems from the Ministry funded research project TRACEgen (TRADUCCIÓN Y CENSURA EN LA REPRESENTACIÓN DEL GENERO: FFI2012-39012-C04-04).

Published in Calls for Papers

The Translator
Special Issue: International English and Translation (November 2017)

Guest edited by Rita Queiroz de Barros (University of Lisbon and University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies) and Karen Bennett (New University of Lisbon and University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies)
Deadlines: 30 Nov 2015 (abstract); 30 Sep 2016 (article)

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/ah/cfp_int_english_translation

Published in Journals

EXTENDED DEADLINE (01/03/2015) FOR LITERARY AND TECHINCAL TRANSLATION CONTRIBUTIONS

Thanks for the overwhelming response to this CfP and thank you to all those who submitted their abstracts for AVT. The new deadile is for more technical translation contributions and ESPECIALLY for Literary Translation Commentaries.

 

Call for Papers

 

 Dr Margherita Dore

Department of European, American and Intercultural Studies

University of Rome La Sapienza

Italy

 

Achieving Consilience. Translation Theories and Practice

 

Published in Edited Collections

Assistant Professor in Translation Studies

University of Nottingham -Language Centre

Location: University Park

Salary: £36,661 to £45,053 per annum pro-rata depending on skills and experience. Salary progression beyond this scale is subject to performance.

Closing Date: Thursday 15 May 2014

 

Published in Academic
Saturday, 15 June 2013 14:03

East Asian Translation Studies Conference

This is to inform that we will be holding an international conference on East Asian Translation Studies at University of East Anglia, UK, on 19 and 20 June 2014.

Published in Calls for Papers
Thursday, 16 February 2012 09:10

The Taboo Conference - Second CfP

The Taboo Conference – TaCo201

 University of Bologna at Forlì (Italy), 25-27 October 2012

http://taco2012.sitlec.unibo.it

 

Second call for papers

 

In a world that seems continuously to be pushing the envelope of what is acceptable to the inhabitants of specific linguistic and cultural contexts, this interdisciplinary conference acknowledges the importance of investigating taboos and their reinforcement/breaking in various areas of language, culture and society, and across different cultures. We propose to explore the delicate balance and subtle boundaries between the need for inclusion and respect for different ethnic, religious, sexual, etc. backgrounds – which seems to be at the basis of modern multicultural societies – and a (un)conscious push towards the breaking of existing taboos, for example for shock value, as in the case of humour. In such context, investigation of the linguistic, cultural, social, institutional and personal implications of taboo reinforcement/breaking appears of extreme value.

Published in Conferences
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