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Edward Clay

Editors

Esther Monzó-Nebot | Universitat Jaume I

Melissa Wallace | University of Texas at San Antonio

For more information, click here

Since the global Covid-19 pandemic of March 2020, many universities have decided to transfer their face-to-face teaching provision to online platforms. Overnight, academics and students have seen their working environment change dramatically. Initial discussions among the academic community seem to indicate that the transition is not without a number of hurdles, despite prior experience in using virtual learning environments and/or incorporating a distance component to face-to-face teaching. While blended learning approaches have been widely encouraged and often applied in university contexts, the speed and wholesale nature of the recent transition has prompted many to rethink how they teach and to look for new pedagogical ideas.
Translation and Interpreting Studies (TIS) have also trialled blended learning approaches in the teaching of these subjects for a number of years. Recent efforts to administer TIS course content at a distance have led to a call for more research investigating the use synchronous and asynchronous media (Colina and Angelelli, 2016). Although currently underexplored in TIS research, Distance Learning represents a substantial area of research in other fields, such as Education. There are notorious difficulties that arise from moving face-to-face course content into virtual environments, from designing an online course to administering assessment and fostering collaboration, interaction, and engagement.
In this special issue, we are proposing to explore some of these difficulties in TIS. We will invite contributions covering the following key themes:
• Online pedagogy (latest trends)
• (a)synchronous teaching: challenges and opportunities in TIS
• TIS curriculum and module design for online delivery
• TIS technologies at a distance
• TIS online Assessment
• Fostering TIS (a)synchronous collaboration, interaction, and engagement
• Acquiring online translation/interpreting work experience
Following a recent set of workshops on the topic of online teaching organised by the Association of Programmes in Translation and Interpreting Studies (APTIS), several academics in TIS have already been identified as potential contributors to this special issue.

Call deadline: 31 July 2020 extended abstracts; 31 October 2020 full papers

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The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Activism provides an accessible, diverse and ground-breaking overview of literary, cultural, and political translation across a range of activist contexts.

As the first extended collection to offer perspectives on translation and activism from a global perspective, this handbook includes case studies and histories of oppressed and marginalised people from over twenty different languages. The contributions will make visible the role of translation in promoting and enabling social change, in promoting equality, in fighting discrimination, in supporting human rights, and in challenging autocracy and injustice across the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, East Asia, the US and Europe.

With a substantial introduction, thirty-one chapters, and an extensive bibliography, this Handbook is an indispensable resource for all activists, translators, students and researchers of translation and activism within translation and interpreting studies.

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This book presents new research on sight translation using cutting-edge eye-tracking technology. It covers various aspects of sight translation processes of both novice and professional interpreters, such as their textual processing behaviors, problem-solving patterns and reading-speech coordination. By focusing on the features of their gaze behaviors, the book describes the interpreters' processing behaviors and categorizes them into different processing styles. As one of the first books on sight translation employing an eye-tracking technique as the research method, it offers a valuable reference guide for future eye-tracking-based translation and interpreting research.

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About University of Electronic Science and Technology of China 

University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC) is a national key university directly under the Ministry of Education of China. UESTC was included as one of the first universities into "Project 211" in 1997, and then the nation's “Project 985” in 2001. In 2017, UESTC was included in Category A of the “World-class University” project. After more than sixty years of development, UESTC now has evolved into a key multidisciplinary university covering all-around programs in electronic disciplines with electronic science and technology as its nucleus, engineering as its major field and a harmonious integration of science, engineering, management, liberal arts and medical science. 

School of Foreign Languages 

Based on the Teaching and Research Office for Foreign Languages founded in 1956, School of Foreign Languages (SFL) was established in 2001. SFL offers a first level master’s degree in Foreign Languages and Literature and a master’s degree in Interpreting and Translation. Under the first level of Foreign Languages and Literature, areas of study include: Foreign Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, Cognitive Neurolinguistics, Translation, Foreign Literature (including English, French, Japanese and Russian), Comparative Literature and Intercultural Studies, Country and Regional Studies, and other research areas. In addition, we also offer a Master program for a professional degree, i.e., Master of Translation and Interpreting (MTI). There are now 107 faculty members and more than 700 students with a 10% annual growth rate.  

Qualifications and Requirements 

Basic requirements: Have good morals and ethics, and abide by academic ethics. Ideally more than two –year teaching and research full-time working experience, able to meet the job requirements. ALL nationalities are eligible. 

Qualifications 

  • Possess a PHD degree granted by prestigious overseas universities 
  • He/She has rich teaching and research experience and good academic development potential 
  • Be able to work full time in China.  

Preferential Policies and Treatments 

  • Annual salary: on a case-by-case negotiation round 
  • Settling-in and housing subsidies and reasonable start-up funds will be provided according to different positions. 

Application 

  • Personal Curriculum Vitae with the list of academic achievements and representative achievements  
  • A photocopy of the PHD degree certificate, and the current professional and technical position/rank certificate, and award certificate, etc. 
  • Valid all the year round 

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Translation, Interpreting and Transfer takes as its basis an inclusive view of translation and translation studies. It covers research and scholarly reflection, theoretical and methodological, on all aspects of the core activities translation and interpreting, but also similar rewriting and recontextualisation practices such as adaptation, localisation, transcreation and transediting, keeping Roman Jakobson’s inclusive view on interlingual, intralingual and intersemiotic translation in mind. The title of the series, which includes the more encompassing concept of transfer, reflects this broad conceptualisation of translation matters.

Through its Research Summer School and other activities, CETRA (Centre for Translation Studies) has a reputation in supporting young researchers unfold their potential and in fostering excellence. Besides monographs and edited volumes from established researchers, this series particularly welcomes proposals from PhD candidates and early-career researchers, English translations of PhD theses in other languages, and CETRA Summer School papers.

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Lorca in English examines the evolution of translations of Federico García Lorca into English as a case of rewriting and manipulation through politically and ideologically motivated translation. As new translations of Federico García Lorca continue to appear in the English-speaking world and his literary reputation continues to be rewritten through these successive re-translations, this book explores the reasons for this constant desire to rewrite Lorca since the time of his murder right into the 21st century. From his representation as the quintessential Spanish Republican martyr, to his adoption through translation by the Beat Generation, to his elevation to iconic status within the Queer Studies movement, this volume analyzes the reasons for this evolution and examines the current direction into which this canonical author is heading in the English-speaking world.

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This book explores literary translation in a variety of contexts. The chapters showcase the research into literary translation in North America, Europe, and Asia.

Written by a group of experienced researchers and young academics, the contributors study a variety of languages (including English, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, French, Japanese, Dutch, German, and Swedish), use a wide range of approaches (including quantitative review of literary translations; transfictional approaches to translation; and a review of concepts such as paratexts, intralingual translation, intertextuality, and retranslation), and aim to expand on existing debates on translation and translation studies as a discipline. The chapters aim to provide a panorama of the variety of topics and interests of contemporary translation studies, as well as problematize some of the concepts and approaches that seem to have become the only accepted/acceptable model in some academic quarters.

This book was originally published as a special issue of Perspectives Studies in Translation Theory and Practice.

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Friday, 03 July 2020 10:34

TransLinguaTech Call for Papers

TransLinguaTech is a peer-reviewed journal which focuses on translation, language and relevant technologies.

The rapid development of machine translation and other language technologies presents fundamental challenges to researchers and practitioners in translation, calling for reconsideration of various aspects of translation such as its definition, agent, object and method. However, there are few platforms dedicated to the issues brought about by the challenge. TransLinguaTech aims at providing a venue dedicated to such discussion, welcoming manuscripts on translation, language and relevant technologies.

Specifically, we welcome papers dealing with:

 

    • Challenges and changes in research and practice in the field of translation and language.

 

    • New theoretical and conceptual discussions about translation and other linguistic practices including redefinition of concept, agent, object and method.

 

    • New methodological discussions about research on translation and other linguistic practices

Deadline for submissions: 5 November 2020

For more information, click here

We are happy to announce that the 1st International conference: Translating Minorities and Conflict in Literature will be held in Cordoba, 10-11 June 2021

Confirmed keynote speakers: Maria Tymoczko and Loredana Polezzi

Call for papers International conference: Translating Minorities and Conflict in Literature

Following in the footsteps of recent conferences (Translation and Minority, University of Ottawa, 2016; Justice and minorized languages under a postmonolingual order, Castelló de la Plana, 2017) and publications (Translation and minority, lesser-used and lesser-translated languages and cultures, JoSTrans, 2015), the aim of this conference is to explore the ways in which translating literature can serve to protect and empower minority, minor and lesser-used languages, both in contexts of multilingualism where the power balance of the languages spoken in the same country is often unequal, and in situations of conflict, where authors and translators face the threat of physical harm, coercion, censorship and/or exile. In this way, “the struggle to sustain languages in danger often equally implies the need to redress longstanding problems of marginalisation, stigmatisation and misrepresentation” (Folaron 2015: 16). Moreover, in a world where ‘minority’ is understood as a struggle against the mainstream and where Anglo-American-led processes of globalization and cultural export are reshaping transnational literary production and circulation, translation flows from minor and minoritized languages are largely uneven.

Since the publication of The Manipulation of Literature (Hermans, 1985), Comparative Literature scholars have been obliged to confront the manipulation involved in any cultural transfer, particularly through translation. Institutions of culture and the state play an important role in determining the ways texts cross tangible and intangible borders. Hermans denounced three types of marginalisation: the status of translation in Literary Studies and Comparative Literature, the peripheral position of translations in literary corpora, and the absolute supremacy of the source text. Underwriting these critiques, we welcome proposals dealing with non-canonized literature, objects of study rejected by dominant circles of culture and literary movements that aimed to destabilise established literary repertoires.

More than three decades after their arrival, we want to (ap)praise the Manipulation school and Polysystem Theory for the vital role they played in the discipline of Translation Studies. Indeed, the Polysystem Theory focused on the target text as a manipulated text that was produced in a specific literary, historical, political and social context. As Snell-Hornby points out: “Translation is seen as a text type in its own right, as an integral part of the target culture and not merely as the reproduction of another text” (1988: 24).

Their legacy was to help abolish epistemological slaveries that biased Otherness and made room for countercultural manifestations. Their heuristic tools enabled the analysis of literature as a complex and dynamic system, stressed the necessary interaction between theory and practice, introduced a descriptive, target-text-oriented approach and laid the groundwork for the study of norms that condition the production and reception of translations within a specific context, the position of translations within the literary system and the interaction between different national literatures.

With the cultural and the current sociological turns in mind, we would like to stress Bassnett and Lefevere’s words “Rewriting can introduce new concepts, new genres, new devices, and the history of translation is the history also of literary innovation, of the shaping power of one culture upon another. But rewriting can also repress innovation, distort and contain, and in an age of everincreasing manipulation of all kinds, the study of the manipulative processes of literature as exemplified by translation can help us toward a greater awareness of the world in which we live” (1993; vii).

In this spirit, we welcome contributions on the following (or related) topics:

  • Translation from/into indigenous languages
  • Literary translation and sexual minorities
  • Translation in Gendered Contexts
  • Migrant literature
  • Postcolonial literature
  • Translation from peripheral languages and cultures
  • Translation in situations of censorship and war
  • The literary translator as an activist
  • The manipulation of national images through translation

Deadline for submissions: 15 September 2020

For more information, click here

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