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Edward Clay

Guest editor: Aurelia Klimkiewicz

Translation is traditionally represented as a spatial movement between two locations—typically from abroad to home—and presupposes the direct transfer of meaning from one language to another. However, current translation practices are not necessarily limited to movement across space; they can also acquire a more dynamic role that shapes the space itself, both locally and globally, from face-to-face contact to networks of human and non-human actors. This is the idea behind the concept of space as a social construct. Since this concept was introduced by Henri Lefebvre in his 1974 article La production de l’espace, important societal changes have further complexified the perception and experience of space: new technologies and means of production, globalization, free market, mass migration, multiethnic societies, and even increases in leisure travel. Contrary to the nation-state logic that advocates some degree of acculturation or assimilation of the foreign, current translation practices participate in much more complex and dynamic re/configurations of space, including densification (immigration, the multilingualization of cities, tourism), extension (the rise of global markets and institutions), contraction (exile, emigration/immigration) and fragmentation (the formation of diasporas and heterogeneous audiences). This shift from the national to the transnational brings attention to the multiplicity of micro and macro contexts, professional settings, and even alternative patterns of collaboration located in “a ‘liminal space’ between the world of activism and the service economy” (Baker, 23), in which translation may play a vital role.

This issue of Tusaaji invites contributions on the developments in the practice of translation—emerging and/or alternative trajectories, patterns and paths—that challenge the notion of translation as “the Invisible Hand in the market of communication” (Cronin, 29). Questions relevant to these issues include: How do new translation initiatives take place? How do alternative translation projects or actions impact the profession and the translator’s self-regulation and self-perception? How do translators adapt to new professional environments and reflect on their own role and profession? In what circumstances may translators challenge the status quo? What strategies help translators deal with chaos, unpredictability, improvisation and failure? Are translators aware of the impact that their work may have on society and others? What are the new channels of knowledge production emerging from current translation contexts? Is the empowerment of translators in today’s world relevant or not?

Authors are not required to limit themselves to the above list of questions. We welcome papers on all topics discussing theoretical, professional and practical issues, such as:

  • Translation and close vs distant reading
  • Translation and global publishing houses
  • Professional vs non-professional digital literary reception (discussion forums, etc.)
  • Translators and nomadism
  • Translation and tourism advertising 
  • Collaborative forms of translation (professional and amateur)
  • Translation and labour-management relations
  • Volumes and speed of translation and their management 
  • Translation and activism
  • Norms of translation in micro and macro contexts 
  • Factors that accelerate or delay translation production, distribution and/or reception
  • Private translation initiatives
  • Models of tracking, mapping and monitoring the translation activity
  • Translators’ blogs, forums of discussion, etc. 

We invite papers in Spanish, English, French, Portuguese, or any other language of the Americas that deal with this issue’s theme. Given Tusaaji’s hemispheric focus, papers discussing the experience of translation in the Americas from this perspective are welcome; however, this issue is not restricted geographically so submissions about all languages and regions will be considered.

In addition to scholarly articles, we also invite submissions of visual art and of translations in any genre, and from/into any of the languages of the journal.

Deadline: September 30, 2020.  Submissions can be sent to the guest editor, Aurelia Klimkiewicz, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with a copy to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Baker, Mona (2013). “Translation as an Alternative Space for Political Action.” Social Movement Studies, 12:1, 23-47.

Cronin, Michael (2017). “Translation and Post-National Identity in the Digital Age.” In Ivana Hostová (ed.) Identity and Translation Trouble, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.19-33.

For more information, click here

The research group Socio-Cognitive Translation Studies: Processes and Networks (socotrans) at the Centre for Translation Studies at the University of Vienna is delighted to announce an International Conference on Field Research on Translation and Interpreting: Practices, Processes, Networks (FIRE-TI) to be held in Vienna from 18 to 20 February 2021.

The aim of the conference is to bring together researchers who study translation and interpreting (T&I) practices, processes or networks in situ using a variety of different (inter)disciplinary approaches, e. g. from sociological, cognitive, anthropological or ergonomic perspectives. The primary objective thereby is to create a common reflection space for T&I field and workplace research where experts can share insights into the diversity and complexity of translation and interpreting practices. In doing so, the conference also seeks to bring to the fore those particular aspects that are hard to reconstruct through product analyses or in a laboratory setting.

Extended deadline for submissions: 13 September 2020

For more information, click here

Please note that this conference was originally due to take place 27-28 Nov. 2020 but had to be postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

APTIS (the Association of Programmes in Translation and Interpreting Studies, UK and Ireland) has entered the third year since its formation. After two successful conferences held in the UK (at Aston University in 2018 and Newcastle University in 2019), the conference series is coming to Ireland. Dublin City University will be proud to host the 3rd Annual Conference on 19-20 November 2021.

APTIS encourages research into all aspects of translation and interpreting and aims to improve the teaching and learning of these subjects at UK and Irish HE institutions. Previous conferences examined challenges and opportunities involved in the teaching and learning of translation and interpreting and looked to make connections between academic and non-academic settings for such efforts. The conference in Dublin will look to the future and ask scholars, practitioners, and other stakeholders on these islands to come together to discuss evolving profiles of translation and interpreting training.

We invite proposals for papers, panels, and workshops that engage largely but not exclusively with what is yet to come in the world of translation and interpreting (T&I) training. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • T&I and technology now and in the future
  • T&I and AI now and in the future
  • Developments in AVT training
  • Developments in localisation training
  • The future of accessibility in T&I programmes
  • T&I as a profession and as an academic discipline: latest advances/state of the art/future prospects
  • Building a skills base in T&I (project management, content creation, programming)
  • The importance of history to T&I training now and in the future
  • T&I and the EU in the context of Brexit and the lifting of the Irish language derogation
  • Translation and interpreting in the context of language learning
  • Ergonomic issues in T&I training

Deadline for submissions: 22 April 2021

For more information, click here

7th Young Linguists’ Meeting in Poznan (YLMP 2021): 1st Call for Papers

7th Young Linguists' Meeting in Poznan (YLMP 2021) will take place on 23-25 April 2021 in Poznan, Poland. The conference will be organized by the Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan.
The leitmotif of YLMP2021 is: “Rethinking language and identity in the multilingual world”

We welcome submissions in the following areas:
• psycholinguistics
• neurolinguistics
• clinical linguistics
• cognitive linguistics
• sociolinguistics and discourse studies
• language teaching methodology
• translation studies
• experimental pragmatics
• experimental syntax
• phonology and phonetics

PLENARY SPEAKERS:
• Wouter Duyck (Ghent University)
• Katarzyna Jankowiak (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan)
• Julien Perrez (University of Liège)
• Helen Sauntson (York St John University)

Deadline for submissions: 13 November 2020

For more information, click here

After the success of ICTIC 1 (Mendoza, Argentina) and ICTIC 2 (Germersheim, Germany), ICTIC is holding its third edition at the Forlì Campus of the Università di Bologna, Italy, from June 28 to 30, 2021.
In just two editions, ICTIC has become one of the most important venues for scholars working at the interface of translation, interpreting and cognition. This year, we also intend to expand the boundaries of our scientific community and to foster a dialogue with neighbouring research domains to make Cognitive Translation and Interpreting Studies truly interdisciplinary.
ICTIC 3 is organised by the Laboratory for Multilectal Mediated Communication & Cognition (MC2 Lab) of the Dipartimento di Interpretazione e Traduzione of the Università di Bologna and it is endorsed by the TREC network. 

Participants are invited to submit proposals addressing cognitive aspects from any theoretical and methodological perspective of topics such as (but not limited to) the following:

  • accessibility
  • child language brokering and unprofessional translation
  • emerging professional profiles, including respeaking, transcreation and transediting
  • emotions, empathy, perspective taking and theory of mind
  • epistemology
  • ergonomics and human-computer interaction
  • expanding methods: big data, meta-analysis, replication
  • interpreting (remote, dialogue, simultaneous, consecutive, etc.)
  • machine translation, post-editing and revision
  • machine translation literacy
  • multilingualism and professional communication
  • multimodality and oral/written hybrids
  • natural language processing
  • psycholinguistic constructs in CTIS
  • reception of translated products by real readers/listeners
  • sign language translation and interpreting
  • training the translator and the interpreter
  • translation (literary, technical, scientific, audiovisual, etc.)
  • writing and intralingual translation.

Deadline for submission of panel proposals: 30 September 2020

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 31 January 2021 

For more information, click here

 

Translation is one of the foundational features of European culture. It was not until the beginning of the 21st century that the continent finally saw attempts to write its own history from the point of view of translation, but the roots of translation historiography run deeper. French translation historian and theorist Antoine Berman (1942–1991) was among the first Francophone scholars who argued that translation history can help us better understand the histories of European culture, languages, and literature. Unfortunately, his early death did not allow him to demonstrate the fruitfulness of his ideas in actual research. This was also the case of Anton Popovič (1933–1984), the founder of Slovak translation studies. Popovič started developing his concept of translation history in the 1970s and in time came up with a broad understanding of translation history as the concrete histories of translation programs, conceptions, and methods. Since the late 1970s, the translation scholar Jean Delisle has become one of the most prominent voices in translation history methodology. He has penned and edited several “portraits” of male and female translators as well as other histories of translation. Dirk Delabastita, Lieven D’hulst, Michel Ballard, or Henri Meschonnic (see illustrative bibliography below) have also produced important opinions on translation history and historical case studies.
Translation historiography has since become one of the most prevalent topics in translation studies worldwide. The interest is due to the still relevant sociological turn in translation studies and attempts to closely study the work of individual translators. Logically, such issues call for historical contextualization and explanation. The growing number of existing and pending research initiatives covering histories of translations into several world languages allows us to compare and confront various forms and means of translation in different cultural environments, influenced by different geopolitical factors and with different cultural and literary traditions. When looking at Slovak research in translation history (from the 1960s and the 1990s, synthesized between 2013 and 2017, and still in progress) and current Western European research, we see much common ground and many similarities in significant phenomena. This leads us to question the clear-cut models of center-periphery relations in European culture.
Reading various national translation histories in a comparative manner also reminds us that external factors have always affected literature, regardless of political regimes. This issue of World Literature Studies on translation history aims to bring together views from different sociocultural environments and historical backgrounds in order to shed light on the tasks of translators and the methods they employed throughout history.

Deadline for submissions: 30 November 2020

For more information, click here

TRANSLATOLOGIA is seeking original, previously unpublished papers to be included in the second issue of 2020. Contributors may want to focus on any creative industry in their discussion of the concepts of universal accessibility and translation issues.

UNESCO has defined the sector of the cultural and creative industries (CCI) as the field whose principal purpose is the production or reproduction, promotion and dissemination of goods, services and activities of “a cultural, artistic or heritage-related nature” (DCMS 2002; UNESCO 2017). Born in the UK, these industries rely on creativity, intellectual property and human skills and talent and span a variety of activities in at least 11 sectors: “advertising, books, gaming, architecture, music, movies, newspapers and magazines, performing arts, visual arts, radio, TV and design” (Interreg Europe 2017). Their vibrancy reflects in the growth of cities’ cultural activities, creative economy and acting environments, while, at the same time, being the engine of digital economies. CCI tend to encourage citizens’ participation and to boost cities’ attractiveness and urban development.

Drawing on theoretical frameworks from a range of academic fields (e.g. translation studies, museum studies, tourism studies, media studies), and on methodological models based on multimodality, systemic functional linguistics, and audiovisual translation, this special issue seeks to open up a collaborative and supportive space for the understanding of how and to what extent translation as an instrument of accessibility for all can mobilise and control cultural, cognitive, linguistic and political experiences. Studies on universal accessibility as an essential tool for facilitating access to knowledge have shed light on different strategies for the promotion of inclusion through translation within the CCI context (Jiménez Hurtado et al. 2012; Jiménez Hurtado & Soler Gallego 2015). Research on the quality of accessible products as well as on the classification of access services addressed to persons with sensory impairments has been conducted over the years (Díaz Cintas et al. 2007; Díaz Cintas et al. 2010; Di Giovanni & Gambier 2018; Romero Fresco 2019). Yet, there is still a need to explore the role of translation as a device which breaks social, ethnic and linguistic barriers, and to debate the concept of accessibility as a human right for all users (Greco 2016). From these perspectives, accessibility rests on the principle of universality and is based on the removal of cultural and social differences.

Against this backdrop, translation and accessibility, in tandem with new technological solutions, have rapidly gained ground in the creative industries as fundamental conduits for the transmission of information and knowledge for all. The symbiosis between the cultural creative industries and access services has been made possible thanks to audiovisual translation, which happens to be one of the fastest growing areas contributing to the dissemination of “acceptable”, “adaptable” and “available” cultural and artistic contents, both via mass media communication (i.e. broadcasting, cinema, publishing, streaming, etc.) and within public cultural contexts (i.e. museums, theatres, festivals, street art, etc.).

While proposing reflections on wider theoretical and methodological perspectives, this special issue fosters a discourse which not only advances new models of experimentation, analysis and application within the CCI sector, but which also touches on the seductiveness of multimodal productions. The ultimate aim is to evaluate the extent to which translation, as a form of accessibility that deals with phenomena of an intralingual, interlingual and intersemiotic nature, interrelates with CCI.

How can translation, as an instrument of accessibility for all, contribute to the spread of knowledge addressed to audiences with sensory impairments (i.e. the blind and partially sighted people, and the deaf and hard of hearing people), but also to a wider public made of adults, children, men and women, who may be interested in the transmission of cultural contents through the support of specific technological triggers?

Deadline for submissions: 20 September 2020

For more information, click here

Are you an expert in translation and its technologies with proven abilities to carry out profession-oriented teaching on these subjects, with a particular focus on Chinese translation? Are you passionate about delivering an exceptional student experience in a research-intensive Russell Group University? Are you passionate about leading and delivering quality teaching for the renowned MA programmes in translation at University of Leeds? 

The School of Languages, Cultures and Societies, University of Leeds, invites applications for an on-going full-time post at the level of Lecturer (Grade 7) starting in September 2020. The appointment is based in the Centre for Translation Studies in the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies.

You will carry out teaching on our MA in Applied Translation Studies and MA in Audio-visual Translation Studies, with a particular focus on technologies and Chinese-English and English-Chinese translation. You will convene, teach and assess a number of taught postgraduate modules. You will be expected to take on administrative duties in the Centre for Translation Studies, which may include managing these programmes, and to undertake scholarship related to teaching. You may also contribute to the School’s activities, and to the teaching of School-wide undergraduate and postgraduate modules as appropriate.

Deadline for applications: 13 August 2020

For more information, click here

Start date/duration:

  • from 01.10.2020
  • to 30.09.2021, but only until the return of the jobholder

Administrative unit:

  • Department of Translation Studies

Extent of employment:

  • substitute employee - 40 Stunden/Woche

Job Description:

In this position you will carry out high level research and specialise in a particular field. You will hold your own lectures, tutor students and participate in administration.

Euraxess: https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/platforms/jobs/139/PHIL-KULT-11350

Job profile:

The description associated with this job duties and requirements can be found at:
https://www.uibk.ac.at/universitaet/profile-wiss-personal/post-doc.html

Deadline for application: 30 July 2020

For more information, click here

Are you an expert in the theory and practice of audiovisual translation with proven abilities to carry out profession-oriented teaching in the field? Are you passionate about delivering an exceptional student experience in a research-intensive Russell Group University? Are you passionate about leading and delivering quality teaching for the renowned MA programme in Audiovisual Translation at the University of Leeds?

The School of Languages, Cultures and Societies, University of Leeds, invites applications for the above post starting in September 2020. The appointment is based in the Centre for Translation Studies in the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies. 

You will carry out teaching on our MA in Audiovisual Translation Studies, with a particular focus on its core modules Strategies and Tools in Audiovisual Translation (MODL5025M) and Subtitling and Respeaking for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Audiences (MODL5080M). You will also convene, teach and assess on a number of other modules on this and similar postgraduate programmes. You will be expected to take on administrative duties in the Centre for Translation Studies, such as liaising with external professional tutors. You will also contribute to other of the School’s activities, including the teaching of School-wide undergraduate modules, as appropriate.

You will have an MA degree in Audiovisual Translation or Applied Translation Studies, or a PGdip from a professional Audio-Visual Translation or Applied Translation Studies programme with Merit or above, and may have a PhD in this area. You will also have professional experience in Audiovisual Translation.

Deadline for application: 28 July 2020

For more information, click here

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