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Edward Clay

School of Humanities and Social Science now invites applications and nominations for Open Rank Faculty Position in Translation and Interpreting (Ref. AC2023/031/01).

Professor/Associate Professor/Assistant Professor (Tenure-stream) 

a PhD degree in Translation and Interpreting Studies;
high potential in teaching and research;
the ability to teach a wide range of courses, especially in core areas of T&I studies, extensive experience with language service shall be favourably considered;
preferably professional experience in language service provision;
proficiency in Chinese and English. 
Candidate for Full or Associate Professor post is expected to have demonstrated academic leadership and strong commitment to the highest standard of excellence. Appointment will normally be made on contract basis for up to three years initially, leading to longer-term appointment or tenure later subject to mutual agreement. Exceptionally, appointment with tenure can be offered forthwith to candidate of proven ability. 

Key Duties and Responsibilities 

teaching courses as prescribed in the programme curricular;
developing cooperative relations with language service industries;
assisting in curriculum development and administrative assignments. 
The appointee is expected to commence work in AY2023-24. 

Salary & Benefits

Salary will be competitive, commensurate with qualifications and experience. Appointment will be made under the establishment of CUHK, Shenzhen and statutory benefits will be provided according to the prevailing labor laws applicable in the People’s Republic of China. The appointee will be based at the University campus in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China. Successful applicants can also apply for additional benefits through high-talent schemes at the Guangdong provincial level, the Shenzhen city level, and the Longgang district level. 

Deadline for applications: 16 May 2023

For more information, click here

Applications are invited for the position of Associate Professor in Hispanic Studies in the Department of Hispanic Studies, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies (SLLCS) at Trinity College, Dublin.

The School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies welcomes applications from candidates with demonstrated excellence in research, teaching and service for the position of Associate Professor in Hispanic Studies. Field of specialization is open but should not duplicate existing expertise within the Department of Hispanic Studies. 

The successful candidate will have a doctorate in hand at the time of application. They must be willing and able to contribute to all aspects of the Hispanic Studies curriculum, including designing new modules in their subject of expertise for undergraduate students of all levels, as well as introductory and intermediate modules across a range of periods and genres, when required. They must be willing and able to teach Spanish language modules of all levels (from A1 to C2 of the CEFR) and to contribute to School-wide, interdisciplinary undergraduate and taught MPhil programmes, including a potential new MPhil in Iberian and Latin American Studies, currently in planning/designing stages. They will be expected to contribute to developments of new programmes of study across the curriculum, noting that Spanish has a wide and growing range of degree combinations as part of the Trinity Education Project.

Deadline for applications: 24 April 2023

For more information, click here

Postgraduate research is anything but linear. Instead, it is a process of continual untangling – of plucking at a single thread within the tapestry. Methods and methodologies are the tools we use to find and follow those threads, sometimes without really knowing where they might lead. The new and shifting world we live in presents a complex tapestry, and innovative as well as established methods are more necessary than ever. IPCITI 2023 hopes to provide a space for postgraduate researchers to share their ways of knowing, and to keep one another company on this entangled adventure.   

The International Postgraduate Conference in Translation and Interpreting, or IPCITI, is a student-led conference that rotates between four universities with a strong focus on translation and interpreting: Dublin City University, Heriot-Watt University, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Manchester. IPCITI aims to provide an inviting, collaborative and stimulating space for PhD and early-career researchers in translation and interpreting studies to present their research.  

The Heriot-Watt IPCITI team are pleased to announce that, after a 3-year hiatus due to COVID-19, IPCITI is back! After being unable to meet for so long, we are delighted to be welcoming participants back to the campus for this in-person conference, which will be held at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh on 23-24 November 2023. By holding the conference in person, we aim to build in time for informal discussions, meeting new colleagues and opportunities to discuss your own research while also learning about others’ work. 

Abstracts are invited from postgraduate and early-career researchers on topics including, but not limited to:  

  • Multimodal methods
  • Interventionist approaches
  • Ethical questions in TIS methodology
  • TIS during the pandemic: research and practice 
  • Ethnographic approaches 
  • Corpus methodologies 
  • Institutional factors in translation and interpreting
  • Language brokering and non-professional interpreting
  • Investigating identity in translation and interpreting
  • Investigating gender in translation and interpreting
  • Representation and diversity in translation and interpreting

Deadline for submissions: 22 May 2023

This conference aims at shedding new light on the challenges and consequences of cultural misunderstanding. Following an interdisciplinary approach, the theme of the conference will be examined from a linguistic, legal and translational perspective. The intention of the event is to establish a link between theory and praxis. Presentations on different theories and disciplinary approaches are encouraged as well as accounts from the professional life of translators, lawyers and linguists. In the context of this event, we define intercultural misunderstandings both as misunderstandings between cultures of different countries, but also as misunderstandings within the same country due to cultural, regional, social or ethnic differences.

Deadline for submissions: 15 May 2023

For more information, click here

 

Edited by Francesca Raffi (University of Macerata), Emília Perez (Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra) and Matej Martinkovič (Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra)

The concept of paratext was first analysed by Gérard Genette, who defines the term as “what enables a text to become a book and to be offered as such to its readers and, more generally, to the public” (Genette 1997: 1). According to the author, in fact, a literary work not only consists of the main text itself, but is also surrounded by other elements, such as the title, cover, preface and all those elements that help to present it to the public and that “ensure the text’s presence in the world, its ‘reception’ and consumption” (Genette 1997: 1).

The paratexts of (re)translations are indeed elements that offer interesting insights from many perspectives, with retranslation intended as “the act of translating a work that has previously been translated into the same language, or the result of such an act, i.e. the retranslated text itself” (Gürçaglar 2009: 233). By framing the core text in a certain way, these added elements present a work to the audience with the potential to influence its reception. Paratexts are also a powerful tool through which translators may convey their vision and purpose, invite new interpretations, and claim their role.

Paratexts, being flexible, versatile and transitory can thus be a tool for adapting a text to a dynamic and ever-changing target culture, while also offering a place for the (re)translator to claim their presence and visibility. Since the early 2000s, several studies have examined retranslations by taking into account their paratextual aspects to investigate issues related to the context and reception of a given literary (Gürçağlar 2008; Deane-Cox 2012, 2014; Badić 2020, among others) or, more recently, audiovisual (O’Sullivan 2018; Mével 2020; Raffi 2022; Bucaria and Batchelor forthcoming, among others) work. These studies have confirmed that paratextual aspects reflect the context in which a retranslation is produced, highlight the dominant ideologies and norms of a target culture, but may also act as a marketing tool and a catalyst for the (new) audience.

The aim of this issue is to provide an opportunity for scholars in Translation Studies, Reception Studies, and Media Studies, among others, to present their findings, insights, and interdisciplinary perspectives on paratextual elements in the (re)translation of both literary and multimodal works. Following Genette (1997: 12), paratexts may be here intended as a very broad category of elements that are “fundamentally heteronomous, auxiliary, and dedicated to the service of something other than itself”. These may include prefaces, blurbs, notes, interviews, private communications (e.g., letters, diaries), promotional campaigns, fan-made materials, social media posts, endorsements, trailers, among others. The topics of interest may include but are not restricted to those listed below:

  • paratextual elements in (re)translated literary works
  • paratextual elements in (re)translated multimedia works (e.g. films, TV-series, videogames, operas, musicals, theatre plays)
  • accessible paratexts and inclusive design
  • the (in)visibility of the translator
  • paratexts and the editor
  • theoretical and methodological challenges of studying paratexts
  • ideological discourse in (re)translation
  • paratextuality and (re)translation across different media

We welcome full-paper submissions reflecting the abovementioned issues. All articles must be written in English and should not exceed 7,000 words. We also welcome reviews of publications related to the main topic of this issue.

 Deadline for submission: 15 October 2023

For more information, click here

As recently announced, the IAPTI 6th International Conference will be held on November 11-12, 2023, in Timișoara, Romania.

The Call for Papers is still open and we will continue with the proposals selection process until 15 May, 2023. 

Please remember that abstracts should be a maximum of 200 words and be submitted to the Organising Committee at //This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it./" style="color: #e64e4e; text-decoration: none; background-color: transparent; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. *Priority will be given to new topics not presented before at other conferences.* 

Please include a title and description, a short bio (up to 100 words) and a profile photo with your proposal. Speakers will have 45-50 minutes for their presentations and 10 minutes for Q&A.

The Organising Committee reserves the right to accept or reject proposals and will notify applicants accordingly. The conference fee is waived for speakers (1 per presentation) and no other monetary compensation or reimbursement is offered.

For more information, please contact the Organising Committee at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Come and join us for another outstanding IAPTI event with us in the 2023 European Capital of Culture!

For more information, click here

Two-day symposium organized by Alexa Alfer and Cornelia Zwischenberger, held 6-7th July 2023 in London, UK

This symposium will be devoted to explorations of the concept of labour arising from Translab’s hallmark blending of ‘translation’ and ‘collaboration’. It posits that the concept of labour, as distinct from ‘work’ (Arendt 1958/1998; Narotzky 2018), warrants more sustained engagement on the part of both Translation Studies and the translation profession. While digital labour (Fuchs 2020), playbor (Kücklich 2005), fan labour (De Kosnik 2012), affective labour (Hardt 1999; Koskinen 2020), emotional labour (Hochschild 1993), or (im)material labour (Negri & Hardt 2004) may present themselves as particularly topical sites for such exploration, both labour and work are also important yet largely underarticulated dimensions in discussions about translation in a professional context and in debates about the distinction between professional and non-professional translation. Last but not least, we are keen to extend consideration of the labour concept to translation as such, and to interrogate its relevance to current debates about the translation concept.

While the concept of work is perhaps more readily associated with translation in professional discourses at least, translation as labour, i.e. as an activity structurally embedded in capitalist chains of surplus-value production (Zwischenberger and Alfer 2022), features far less prominently in current debates. However, foregrounding labour as a fundamental dimension of translation (and, for that matter, interpreting) allows both researchers and practitioners to investigate translation and interpreting more closely from a socioeconomic perspective. This should, in turn, help develop impactful alternatives to the prevalent ‘professionalisation’ discourses intended to raise the socio-economic status of translators, and critique the ways in which many of these discourses create idealised narratives of translation and interpreting that tend to foreground the processes of work while masking the labour involved in producing outputs whose value is, quietly or overtly, appropriated by those with a stake in the means of their production. Shining a spotlight on the surplus-value inherent in translation as the commodifiable expansion of a source text thus also uncovers the translation concept itself as the site of an unarticulated and unresolved tension between two competing and converging cultural narratives that pivot on conceptions of value as, on the one hand, inextricably bound to and, on the other, posited firmly “outside of a profit-motivated relationship” (Fayard 2021, 216).

Papers are to be submitted by 18 April 2023. 

For more information, click here.

Sunday, 19 March 2023 20:58

Call for PhD Applications at SEERC

The South East European Research Centre invites applications for studying towards a PhD degree of the University of York, through the Doctoral Programme of SEERC. The deadline for applying is April 21, 2023. 

Details concerning the available research topics and the application submission process can be found in the Call for Applications. A small number of fee waiver studentships will become available to qualifying candidates who will apply for full time studies only.

For more information, click here

Two-day symposium organized by Alexa Alfer and Cornelia Zwischenberger, held 6-7th July 2023 in London, UK

This symposium will be devoted to explorations of the concept of labour arising from Translab’s hallmark blending of ‘translation’ and ‘collaboration’. It posits that the concept of labour, as distinct from ‘work’ (Arendt 1958/1998; Narotzky 2018), warrants more sustained engagement on the part of both Translation Studies and the translation profession. While digital labour (Fuchs 2020), playbor (Kücklich 2005), fan labour (De Kosnik 2012), affective labour (Hardt 1999; Koskinen 2020), emotional labour (Hochschild 1993), or (im)material labour (Negri & Hardt 2004) may present themselves as particularly topical sites for such exploration, both labour and work are also important yet largely underarticulated dimensions in discussions about translation in a professional context and in debates about the distinction between professional and non-professional translation. Last but not least, we are keen to extend consideration of the labour concept to translation as such, and to interrogate its relevance to current debates about the translation concept.

While the concept of work is perhaps more readily associated with translation in professional discourses at least, translation as labour, i.e. as an activity structurally embedded in capitalist chains of surplus-value production (Zwischenberger and Alfer 2022), features far less prominently in current debates. However, foregrounding labour as a fundamental dimension of translation (and, for that matter, interpreting) allows both researchers and practitioners to investigate translation and interpreting more closely from a socioeconomic perspective. This should, in turn, help develop impactful alternatives to the prevalent ‘professionalisation’ discourses intended to raise the socio-economic status of translators, and critique the ways in which many of these discourses create idealised narratives of translation and interpreting that tend to foreground the processes of work while masking the labour involved in producing outputs whose value is, quietly or overtly, appropriated by those with a stake in the means of their production. Shining a spotlight on the surplus-value inherent in translation as the commodifiable expansion of a source text thus also uncovers the translation concept itself as the site of an unarticulated and unresolved tension between two competing and converging cultural narratives that pivot on conceptions of value as, on the one hand, inextricably bound to and, on the other, posited firmly “outside of a profit-motivated relationship” (Fayard 2021, 216).

Papers are to be submitted by 18 April 2023. 

For more information, click here.

The Symposium is aimed at students who have recently begun their research as M.A. students, PhD students or those who have recently completed their PhD theses. The purpose of this symposium is to provide a scientific forum within which the next generation of researchers can exchange ideas and present their current research in the field of Translation, Interpreting, Intercultural Studies or East Asian Studies.

We invite proposals for papers relating to the research interests of the Department of Translation and Interpreting & East Asian Studies (UAB), namely:

Translation and interpreting

  1. Specialized translation
  2. Literary translation
  3. Audiovisual translation and media accessibility
  4. Interpreting
  5. Information and communication technologies in translation
  6. Translator and interpreter training
  7. History of translation and interpreting
  8. Interculturality, ideology and the sociology of translation and interpreting
  9. Textuality and translation
  10. Cognitive studies in translation and interpreting
  11. Professional aspects of translation and interpreting
  12. Empirical research in translation and interpreting

East Asian studies

  1. East Asian languages and literatures
  2. Politics and international relations in East Asia
  3. Culture, thought, and interculturality in East Asia
  4. Economy of East Asia

For more information, click here

Deadline for applications: 31 March 2023

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