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Marija Todorova

Nancy Viviana Piñeiro, Freelance translator and interpreterBook cover final

 

 How has the Coronavirus emergency impacted your work? 

I’m a translator and interpreter based in Argentina. I travelled for work to the US in mid-February and have since been stuck in New York due to travel restrictions in my country. I still don’t know when I’ll be able to return. So, first, the project I was working on got interrupted. Now, I’m working from another place, not my home office, not my tools, not my space.


What are you doing to help, to cope, to maintain contacts, and to support individuals and communities?

I am very lucky, because as an activist translator the networks built during the last years have helped me cope with the situation, reach out to others, be aware of the voices of those most in need. 

I was invited to co-edit a chapter in a book about pandemic solidarity around the world. We’re are more or less 15 collaborators, interviewing people/organizations from our respective countries and translating their experiences into English. Once again, the imp
ortance of translation as a tool for social and political change becomes evident in a myriad of ways. 


How important are translation and interpreting in dealing with the emergency in your area of the world? 

Right here in New York, where I’m stuck, lots of materials need to be translated, mostly into Spanish, for the immigrant communities. Because access to quality information is key, translators and interpreters can be very helpful.


And how do we archive the legacies of this time, so they can be shared, and we can learn from them?

As in the example I mentioned above, we need to have a memory of these times.  We need to learn from our history to be able to build something different - as it’s being built right now, all over the world. Language is essential in the exchange of praxes of resistance. 

 

Nancy Viviana Piñeiro is an MA candidate in Latin American Studies at the Universidad de San Martín, and her research is on counter-hegemonic translation practices in the context of socio-environmental struggles.

Wednesday, 26 February 2020 01:34

Open Letter to Australian Prime Minister

The President and Executive Board of IATIS have joined Red T and many other international translator and interpreter associations  advocating for translators and interpreters at risk.

 

An Open Letter was sent to the Australian Prime Minister which you can read in full:

 In commercial contexts, mainstream localization decisions have traditionally targeted markets where a short-term return on investment will offset the localization costs (Exton et al. 2010, 81), whereas, in contexts where social, cultural, or political motivations are more important than the commercial return on investment, localization decisions may instead prioritize the dissemination of information as widely as possible, or specifically to those without access to the knowledge (Ibid; Anastasiou and Schäler 2010). More recently, the term localization has come into use by international aid organizations for their humanitarian practice to refer to the deployment of local resources such as local agents and local response models (Folaron 2019, 204). With such a wide range of contexts in which localization concepts are applied and decisions are made, it seems timely to call for papers examining localization practices around the world across different sectors.  This special issue of the Journal of Internationalization and Localization (JIAL) therefore aims to bring into cognisance previously less recognised locale-specific issues, emerging trends or research projects (including publicly funded research programmes and PhD research) as well as types of localization undertaken and localization tools used or under development. 

On December 11 2019, I had the privilege to participate as IATIS representative in an important event on war and the global  politics of translation held at UN headquarters in New York City and hosted by the Permanent Missions of Spain and the Republic of Fiji to the UN as well as the UN Department of Safety and Security (UNDSS). The event - titled #ProtectLinguists - was a panel discussion featuring a variety of speakers representing the world language community and transnational Human Rights activist communities. The panel discussion was co-organized by Red T, a nonprofit organization advocating for the protection of translators and interpreters in high-risk settings worldwide and moderated by Linda Fitchett of the International Association of Conference Interpreters. The audience was comprised of a remarkable number of representatives from the world languages community, including the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC), International Federation of Translators (FIT), the International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI), Critical Link International (CLI), the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) and the International Association of University Institutes with Translation and Interpretation Programs (CIUTI). 

University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

The Department of Translation and Interpreting at Wits is seeking to employ a Senior Lecturer/Lecturer or Associate Lecturer in Interpreting Studies. Candidates should have experience in training liaison, consecutive and simultaneous interpreters, have native or near native competence in English and at least one other language, preferably two, and be able to handle training across a range of language combinations

Further information from: Prof Judith Inggs - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

https://www.wits.ac.za/vacancies/

Contributions are invited for the fourth issue of

Hieronymus – Journal of Translation Studies and Terminology,

scheduled for publication in December 2017.

Monday, 31 October 2016 06:19

Call for Proposals: HISTORY OF INTERPRETING

(Deadline for submission of proposals extended to 30 November 2016)

The AUSIT 2016 Mini Conference Organising Committee is now inviting translation and interpreting scholars as well as practising translators and interpreters to submit proposals for this national and international gathering of people interested in interpreting and translating.

This year, AUSIT is focussing efforts on raising public awareness of the translating and interpreting profession. The theme of this mini-conference, Practice, Research and Public, offers participants a forum to present on issues related to practice, research and translation and interpreting in the public space.

For more information, please check the following link:

http://www.ausit.org/AUSIT/Events/National_Miniconference_2016_Call_for_Papers.aspx

This conference seeks to interrogate the role of translators in, and of, Asia as participants in, and commentators on, a changing world. Translators minimise or break down barriers between the ‘I’, ‘you’, ‘we’ and ‘Other’, and in doing so, create inclusive local, regional and global experiences and life trajectories for consumers of linguistic and cultural artefacts. Yet, translation can also be an exclusive process: decisions about what is translated, how and for whom, have far-reaching implications for the inclusion and exclusion of certain communities and/or stakeholders, simultaneously empowering some and disempowering others. This conference seeks to explore the ethics of translation in a transforming Asia from the perspective of Asian Translation Traditions (ATT): for further information, please check the complete Call for Papers here (http://future.arts.monash.edu/asiantranslation7/call-for-papers/) Abstracts and panel proposals can be submitted online before midnight on 23rd December 2015.

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