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Dr Kathryn Batchelor

Kathryn Batchelor is Lecturer in French and Francophone Studies and a founder member of the Centre for Translation and Comparative Cultural Studies at the University of Nottingham, UK. She is the author of Decolonizing Translation (Manchester, St Jerome, 2009) and co-editor of Translating Thought/Traduire la Pensée (special issue of Nottingham French Studies, 2010) and of Intimate Enemies: Translation in Francophone Contexts (Liverpool University Press, 2013). Her main research interests are in postcolonial translation studies, translation theory, literary translation, philosophical translation, and translation relating to Africa.

As the 'thresholds' through which readers and viewers access texts, paratexts have already sparked important scholarship in literary theory, digital studies and media studies. Translation and Paratexts explores the relevance of paratexts for translation studies and provides a framework for further research. Published by Routledge in the Translation Theories Explored series. Available in paperback, hardback, and as an e-book.

Verbal and visual paratexts in translation and interpreting studies

A one-day ARTIS workshop

Wednesday 12 September 2018

University of Nottingham, UK

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 12 June 2018

Broadly understood as the thresholds through which readers and viewers access texts, paratexts have been shown to play a crucial role in the reception and interpretation of texts. While Gérard Genette’s original theorisation of paratexts took place in the context of literary print culture, in recent years the concept has been fruitfully applied to digital contexts and other kinds of texts, notably film, television and video games. The types of paratexts studied in these contexts are many and varied; examples include trailers, game strategy guides, e-reading devices, discussion forums, spoilers and fan-vids. In translation studies, research has tended to focus on the paratexts of printed translation products, such as book covers, translators’ prefaces and translators’ footnotes, but there is considerable scope for applying the concept to research in digital and audiovisual translation studies. The notion of the paratext is also potentially relevant to research into interpreting, where it might be used to investigate prosodic variation, body language, or other framing devices.

Translating Frantz Fanon provides  an innovative look at the reception of Frantz Fanon’s texts, investigating how, when, where and why these—especially his seminal Les Damnés de la Terre (1961) —were first translated and read.

Assistant Professor in Translation Studies

University of Nottingham -Language Centre

Location: University Park

Salary: £36,661 to £45,053 per annum pro-rata depending on skills and experience. Salary progression beyond this scale is subject to performance.

Closing Date: Thursday 15 May 2014

 

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