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The 3rd East Asian Translation Studies Conference (EATS 3)

DESCRIPTION

Dates: June 28-29, 2019

Venue: Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy

Keynote Speakers:

Prof Anthony Pym (University of Melbourne)

Prof Giorgio Amitrano (Università di Napoli L’Orientale)

Conference Theme: “From the Local to the Global and Back. Translation as a Construction of Plural and Dialogic Identities of East Asia”

This Conference on East Asian Translation Studies (EATS) aims to provide a platform for translators and researchers working in the East Asian context (China, Korea and Japan in particular) to exchange ideas on issues related to translation. The first East Asian Translation Studies Conference was held at the University of East Anglia, UK, on 19-20 June 2014, which was successfully concluded with fruitful discussions on history, practice, and theory of translation, as well as new trends in the field. The second conference held at Meiji University in Japan on July 9-10, 2016 was a continuation of those dialogues, bringing the focus on the concept and role of “East Asia” and its influence on translation studies (TS).

The Third Conference will be held at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice on June 28-29, 2019.

We wish to promote a general discussion on how translation has been influenced by contemporary global/local contradictions in the East Asian sphere. People’s mobility and migration as well as travelling ideas and theories are the fertile soil for the practice of translation, texts and people being deeply transformed by language and culture contamination.
The conference theme “From the Local to the Global and Back. Translation as a Construction of Plural and Dialogic Identities of East Asia” intends to provide participants an opportunity to share their views on East Asian translation and its scholarship and to seek the possibility to extend the concept and role of East Asia to further develop TS.

Final Round Table: Area studies and translation studies: ideas, synergies and research methodology

We invite papers on the following topics and beyond:

Translation and interpreting in East Asia;East Asian traditions of literary translation;Circulation and consumption of translation in East Asia;Networks and collaborations among interpreters and translators;Translation and interpreting for immigrant communities in East Asia;Community interpreting in East AsiaPost-colonial approaches to translation;Gender identities in the East Asian context;Pedagogical approach to translation in East Asia;Translation in popular culture, such as animation, comics, music, TV dramas, films;Translation by amateurs, such as fansubs, scanlations and volunteer translation;Translation studies and the digital;Machine translation, computer-aided translation and East Asian languages.

We also welcome proposals for cross-language panels on inspiring topics (either 3 or 6 speakers in one panel). The conference language is English. Please note this in your abstract submission.

We plan to publish selected papers.

DEADLINE
Please submit your abstract (max. 500 words) by September 30, 2018 to the following email address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Successful applicants will be notified by December 2018

REGISTRATION FEE
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EMAIL ADDRESS FOR INQUIRIES
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

ORGANISERS
Local organisers:
Dr Paolo Magagnin (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice) 
Dr Caterina Mazza (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice) 
Prof Nicoletta Pesaro (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice) 

STEERING COMMITTEE
Dr Gloria Lee (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong) 
Dr Nana Sato-Rossberg (SOAS, University of London) 

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Prof Anne Bayard-Sakai (Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales, Paris)
Prof Sungeun Cho (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies)
Prof Sharon Tzu-Yun Lai (National Taiwan Normal University)
Dr Robert Neather (Hong Kong Baptist University)
Dr Akiko Uchiyama (The University of Queensland)
Prof Judy Wakabayashi (Kent State University)

[in alphabetical order]

WEBSITE ADDRESS
https://thewaysoftranslation.com/eats3

Published in Conferences

The 3rd East Asian Translation Studies Conference (EATS 3)

DESCRIPTION

Dates: June 28-29, 2019

Venue: Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy

Keynote Speakers:

Prof Anthony Pym (University of Melbourne)

Prof Giorgio Amitrano (Università di Napoli L’Orientale)

Conference Theme: “From the Local to the Global and Back. Translation as a Construction of Plural and Dialogic Identities of East Asia”

This Conference on East Asian Translation Studies (EATS) aims to provide a platform for translators and researchers working in the East Asian context (China, Korea and Japan in particular) to exchange ideas on issues related to translation. The first East Asian Translation Studies Conference was held at the University of East Anglia, UK, on 19-20 June 2014, which was successfully concluded with fruitful discussions on history, practice, and theory of translation, as well as new trends in the field. The second conference held at Meiji University in Japan on July 9-10, 2016 was a continuation of those dialogues, bringing the focus on the concept and role of “East Asia” and its influence on translation studies (TS).

The Third Conference will be held at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice on June 28-29, 2019.

We wish to promote a general discussion on how translation has been influenced by contemporary global/local contradictions in the East Asian sphere. People’s mobility and migration as well as travelling ideas and theories are the fertile soil for the practice of translation, texts and people being deeply transformed by language and culture contamination.
The conference theme “From the Local to the Global and Back. Translation as a Construction of Plural and Dialogic Identities of East Asia” intends to provide participants an opportunity to share their views on East Asian translation and its scholarship and to seek the possibility to extend the concept and role of East Asia to further develop TS.

Final Round Table: Area studies and translation studies: ideas, synergies and research methodology

We invite papers on the following topics and beyond:

Translation and interpreting in East Asia;East Asian traditions of literary translation;Circulation and consumption of translation in East Asia;Networks and collaborations among interpreters and translators;Translation and interpreting for immigrant communities in East Asia;Community interpreting in East AsiaPost-colonial approaches to translation;Gender identities in the East Asian context;Pedagogical approach to translation in East Asia;Translation in popular culture, such as animation, comics, music, TV dramas, films;Translation by amateurs, such as fansubs, scanlations and volunteer translation;Translation studies and the digital;Machine translation, computer-aided translation and East Asian languages.

We also welcome proposals for cross-language panels on inspiring topics (either 3 or 6 speakers in one panel). The conference language is English. Please note this in your abstract submission.

We plan to publish selected papers.

DEADLINE
Please submit your abstract (max. 500 words) by September 30, 2018 to the following email address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Successful applicants will be notified by December 2018

REGISTRATION FEE
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

EMAIL ADDRESS FOR INQUIRIES
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

ORGANISERS
Local organisers:
Dr Paolo Magagnin (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice) 
Dr Caterina Mazza (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice) 
Prof Nicoletta Pesaro (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice) 

STEERING COMMITTEE
Dr Gloria Lee (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong) 
Dr Nana Sato-Rossberg (SOAS, University of London) 

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Prof Anne Bayard-Sakai (Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales, Paris)
Prof Sungeun Cho (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies)
Prof Sharon Tzu-Yun Lai (National Taiwan Normal University)
Dr Robert Neather (Hong Kong Baptist University)
Dr Akiko Uchiyama (The University of Queensland)
Prof Judy Wakabayashi (Kent State University)

[in alphabetical order]

WEBSITE ADDRESS
https://thewaysoftranslation.com/eats3

Published in Conferences

International Conference: Lisbon 13th to 15th December. 2nd Call. 

In the 15th and 16th centuries, the linguistic situation in Europe was one of remarkable fluidity. Latin, the great scholarly lingua franca of the medieval period, was beginning to crack as the tectonic plates shifted beneath it, but the vernaculars had not yet crystallized into the national languages that they would become a century later, and bi- or multilingualism was still rife. Through the influence of print capitalism, the dialects that occupied the informal space were starting to organise into broad fields of communication and exchange (Anderson 2006: 37-46), though the boundaries between them were not yet clearly defined nor the links to territory fully established. Meanwhile, elsewhere in the world, languages were coming into contact with an intensity that they had never had before (Burke 2004: 111-140), influencing each other and throwing up all manner of hybrids and pidgins as peoples tried to communicate using the semiotic resources they had available. New lingua francas emerged to serve particular purposes in different geographic regions or were imposed through conquest and settlement (Ostler 2005: 323-516). And translation proliferated at the seams of such cultural encounters, undertaken for different reasons by a diverse demographic that included missionaries, scientists, traders, aristocrats, emigrés, refugees and renegades (Burke 2007: 11-16).

This fascinating linguistic maelstrom has understandably attracted the attention of scholars from a variety of different backgrounds. Cultural historians have studied the relationship between language, empire and mission, processes of cultural transmission and the influence of social, political and economic factors on human communications. Historical linguists have investigated language contact, codification and language change (Zwartjes 2011). Translation studies specialists are interested in how translation was conceptualized and practised during the period (Kittel et al. 2007), and literary scholars have looked at how multilingualism is represented in plays and poems of the period (Delabastita and Hoenselaars 2015). There have also been postcolonial engagements with the subject, given the often devastating effects of Western European language ideologies on precolonial plurilingual practices (e.g. Canagarajah and Liyanage 2005), as well as gendered perspectives, centring on women’s language in different cultural spaces.

Published in Conferences

The work of language professionals is not always sufficiently appreciated. However, were it not for their work, it would be impossible for us all to enjoy world literature or the fruits of scientific and technological progress or to access different other cultures. The understanding among nations and the pursuit of peace would also be jeopardized were it not for the contribution of language professionals.
The Asociación Cubana de Traductores e Intérpretes (ACTI) and the Ordre des traducteurs, terminologues et interprètes agréés du Québec (OTTIAQ) invite you to their XIth Cuba-Québec International Symposium on Translation, Terminology and Interpretation for an analysis and discussion of the Social Footprint of Translators, Terminologists and Interpreters (TTIs). The symposium will be held on December 5–7, 2018 in Varadero (Cuba)—world renowned for its resorts and beaches.

Deadline for submission of abstracts (no more than 250 words): June 30, 2018

See full Call for papers 

Published in Calls for Papers

In the 15th and 16th centuries, the linguistic situation in Europe was one of remarkable fluidity. Latin, the great scholarly lingua franca of the medieval period, was beginning to crack as the tectonic plates shifted beneath it, but the vernaculars had not yet crystallized into the national languages that they would become a century later, and bi- or multilingualism was still rife.
This interdisciplinary conference welcomes proposals for 15-20 minute papers on translation and other language-related topics dealing with the period 1400 to 1800. Thematic panel proposals are also welcome (2-hour sessions involving 3-4 speakers).

Published in Conferences

Verbal and visual paratexts in translation and interpreting studies

A one-day ARTIS workshop

Wednesday 12 September 2018

University of Nottingham, UK

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 12 June 2018

Broadly understood as the thresholds through which readers and viewers access texts, paratexts have been shown to play a crucial role in the reception and interpretation of texts. While Gérard Genette’s original theorisation of paratexts took place in the context of literary print culture, in recent years the concept has been fruitfully applied to digital contexts and other kinds of texts, notably film, television and video games. The types of paratexts studied in these contexts are many and varied; examples include trailers, game strategy guides, e-reading devices, discussion forums, spoilers and fan-vids. In translation studies, research has tended to focus on the paratexts of printed translation products, such as book covers, translators’ prefaces and translators’ footnotes, but there is considerable scope for applying the concept to research in digital and audiovisual translation studies. The notion of the paratext is also potentially relevant to research into interpreting, where it might be used to investigate prosodic variation, body language, or other framing devices.

Published in Calls for Papers

Translation Horizons (Edited by Beijing Foreign Studies University, published by Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press)

Special Issue Call for Papers: Translation of Classical Chinese Novels: Texts, Paratexts and Contexts

Published in Calls for Papers
Tuesday, 26 December 2017 18:07

MULTILINGUAL HUMOUR IN TRANSLATION

SPECIAL ISSUE - MULTILINGUAL HUMOUR IN TRANSLATION

Guest Editor: Dr. Margherita Dore
University of Rome “La Sapienza”
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Calls for Papers

International Conference

Protest and Dissent in Translation and Culture

organized by

Department of Anglophone Cultures and Literatures

University of Social Sciences and Humanities (SWPS)

Warsaw, 11-13 May 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS

Though dissent and protest seem to be strongly linked with politics and with political actions, the range of their senses and uses is much broader and, as Amit Chaudhuri has noticed, dissent is inscribed in the very idea of the literary which, "in its resistance to interpretation, is a peculiar species of dissent." The common ground of protest and dissent is, very generally, a disagreement with what is, and an expression of the necessity of some change which seems to be standing behind the very gestures of dissension or protestation. This expression may take various forms and make use of various modalities coming from different cultures, states and places. Protest and dissent may sometimes be individual gestures, as seems to be the case with Melville's Bartleby's famous "I would prefer not to", though the outdoor reading of "Bartleby, the Scrivener" organized by Occupy Wall Street supporters at Zuccotti Park in New York in November 2011 was an event which renarrated the story as "resonating quite well with the mission of the OWS protest" because it not only questioned the assumed hierarchy and expressed the strength of passive resistance, but also because it was set on Wall Street. Dominance and resistance seem to be inevitably speaking through various narratives and stories we live by, the stories which are narrated and renarrated, framed and reframed in different social, political and language communities and realities, through different media and means, and translated into different contexts and languages. The notion of framing, Mona Baker claims in "Reframing Conflict in Translation", allows us "to see translational choices not merely as local linguistic challenges but as contributing directly to the narratives that shape our social world". The ways in which we name, rename, or label events, groups of people, even places have implications in the real world and may help us realize that the world is not made up of universally accepted norms, but that we also partake in negotiating its construction, its changing meanings and senses. Protest and dissent do not necessarily have to be an incentive to a revolutionary change, to a shift of the dominant, but may testify to there being what Edward Said called simply "something beyond the reach of dominating systems", something which limits power and "hobbles" it also through translatological resistance to finality.

We invite papers looking at protest and dissent from different theoretical and methodological perspectives (Translation Studies, Literary Criticism, Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Discourse Analysis, Feminist and Gender Studies, Queer Theory, Philosophy, Sociology, History of Ideas, Colonial and Postcolonial Studies), papers not only theorizing protest and dissent but also papers engaged in broadly understood disagreement, disapproval, critique or resistance, potentials of conflict management and/or the educational and pedagogical dimensions of dissent. We also invite papers showing how narratives of dissent and protest (novels, poems, stories, histories, films, news, press articles, protest songs ...) are renarrated/translated in different social and political contexts and the ways in which translators' choices may be oriented or disoriented. If Jacques Rancière is right saying that "the essence of politics is the manifestation of dissensus as the presence of two worlds in one", then translation, as an inevitably divided activity, may be a kind of discourse which reveals that oneness may be one of those ideas which harbour consensual dominance and the end of politics, the end of dissensual plurality and the beginning of the police which, in different disguises, finds these days its way to the streets of numerous places of the world.

We suggest the following, broad, thematic areas as issues for disputes and highly probable clashes of ideas:

Rhetoric(s) of protest and dissent
Narrating/renarrating protest and dissent
Dissent and protest in intercultural contexts
Dissent and protest in the culture of global/local politics
Translating protest
Translating dissent
Translation-power-resistance
Empowerment and translation
Resisting power/power of resistance
Discourses of dissent and protest
Discursive strategies of protest and dissent
Discursive analyses of protest and dissent
Pedagogy/ies of dissent
Manipulating protest and dissent

Protest and persuasion
Conflict/protest/dissent
Translating conflict
Literature(s) of protest
Protest/dissent and media
Protest/attack/defense
Protesters/dissenters as friends
Protester/dissenters as enemies
Good guys and bad guys
Protest and activism
Activating/de-activating protest and dissent
Global dissents and/in translation
Solidarity in translation
Translating collectives/collective translations

Keynote speakers:
Professor Mona Baker (University of Manchester)
Professor Ben Dorfman (Aalborg University)
Professor Hanna Komorowska (University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw)
Professor Tadeusz Rachwał (University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw)

Venue: University of Social Sciences and Humanities, ul. Chodakowska 19/31, Warsaw, Poland.

Proposals for 20-minute papers (ca 250 words) should be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 20 February 2017. We also encourage panel proposals (comprised of 3 to 4 papers, and an additional 100-150 words explaining how they are interlinked in addressing the panel theme). 
Notification of acceptance will be sent by 28 February 2017.
The deadline for registration and payment of the conference fee: 31 March 2017.

The conference fee is 550 PLN | 130 EUR | 140 USD for all participants.

Conference organizers: Dr. Agnieszka Pantuchowicz and Dr. Anna Warso.

Conference website: https://portal.swps.edu.pl/web/protest-and-dissent-in-translation-and-culture 

Published in Calls for Papers

 

 

CULTUS 10 : Multilingualism, Lingua Franca or What? (2nd call)

 

Call for Abstracts: 20 December, 2016          Call for papers: 1 April, 2017

Cultus 10 will begin with a conversation with renowned linguist, comparative literature and translation theorist Professor Susan Bassnett. The issue will focus on multilingual situations, and how the language issue is resolved. How tenable is the solution and what are the consequences? This brings politics and power into the question, as well as the short and long term costs of the choices made. 

We welcome papers that address issues related to the following themes with a focus on translation:

- Multilingualism power and empowerment

- Politics and power in language

- Use of a lingua franca in professional encounters

- Professional practice, discourse and the new media

- The role of machine translation in professional practice

Published in Calls for Papers
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