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Monday, 18 April 2011 18:55

Accomodation Details

Accommodation has to be booked using the relevant form (click here to download it). For further information you may contact:

 

FAIRFIELD CORPORATE VENTURES

Tel:  +27 (21) 936 4600

Fax:  +27 (21) 936 4654

Website:  www.fairfieldtours.com

Melanie Koegelenberg

Conference Co-ordinator

E-mail:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Candice America

Conference Co-ordinator

E-mail:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

ACCOMMODATION BOOKING AND RATES

  • Rates are subject to change without prior notification.

  • Please note that all the above prices cannot be guaranteed, due to annual inflationary and producer price increases.  An annual increase of 10-15% can be assumed.

  • Rates exclude any other transport and extras (such as gratuity, meals, beverages, activities, etc) not mentioned in the proposal.

VICTORIA & ALFRED HOTEL - Waterfront

Luxury Hotel

Provisional Booking: 30 x Single Rooms

(15 x Mountain Facing & 15 x Piazza Facing)

10 x Piazza Facing:  R 905.00 per room per night (B&B)

5 x Piazza Facing:  R 1,123.00 per room per night (B&B)

10 x Mountain Facing:  R 1,220.00 per room per night (B&B)

5 x Mountain Facing:  R 1,500.00 per room per night (B&B)

RADISSON HOTEL - Waterfront

Luxury Hotel

Provisional Booking:  53 x Single Rooms

Single:  R 1,125.00 per room per night (B&B)

Sharing:  R 1,350.00 per room per night (B&B)

CITY LODGE WATERFRONT - Waterfront

Comfortable accommodation 5 minutes’ walk from the Waterfront and Cape Town City Centre

Provisional Booking:  60 x Single Rooms

Single:  R 684.00 per room per night (B&B)

BREAKWATER LODGE - Waterfront

Very basic accommodation 2 minutes’  walk from the Waterfront and 5 minutes’ walk from Cape Town city centre.

Provisional Booking:  40 x Single Rooms

Single:  R 635.00 per room per night (B&B)

PROTEA HOTEL VICTORIA JUNCTION - Waterfront

Good accommodation 10 minutes’ walk from the Waterfront, 5 minutes’ walk from Cape Town city centre

Provisional Booking:  50 x Single Rooms

Single:  R 1,164.00 per room per night (Room Only)

Breakfast:  R 95.00 per person

FEATHERS LODGE - Bellville / Durbanville

Guest House close to the University of the Western Cape, 20 minutes’ drive from the Waterfront

Single Room:   R 550.00 per room per night

(Standard Room, room only)

Double Room:   R 750.00 per room per night

(Standard Room, room only)

Breakfast:  R 60.00 per person

EVERTSDAL GUEST HOUSE - Bellville / Eversdal

Guest House close to the University of the Western Cape, 20 minutes’ drive from the Waterfront

Single Room:  R 520.00 per room per night (B&B)

Double Room:  R 770.00 per room per night (B&B)

BELL ROSEN GUEST HOUSE - Bellville / Welgemoed

Guest House close to the University of the Western Cape, 20 minutes’ drive from the Waterfront

Single Room:   R 545.00 per room per night (B&B)

Double Room:   R 655.00 per room per night (B&B)

view overlooking vineyard

D’ARIA GUEST COTTAGES - Durbanville

Guest House relatively close to the University of the Western Cape, 20 minutes’ drive from the Waterfront.

Single Room (Cottage): R 420.00 per room per

night (room only)

Sharing Cottage:  R 540.00 per cottage per

night (room only, maximum 2 persons per cottage)

Breakfast:  R 47.00 per person

Monday, 18 April 2011 18:55

Registration Details

To register for the IATIS 2006 Conference, you will need to need to fill in and send the two downloadable registration forms listed below.

Specific contact details, instructions and fees are available within each of the registration forms.

Form A. Conference Registration Form

Word Version

Pdf version

Form B. Accommodation and Tour Reservations

Word Version

Pdf version

 
 

IATIS Members

Non-members

 

Full Rate

Student Rate

Full Rate

Student Rate

Rand

Euro

Rand

Euro

Rand

Euro

Rand

Euro

Early Registration

(before 30th April 2006)

1,525

 

208 ca.

1,130

 

155 ca.

1,990

 

273

ca.

1,560

 

214 ca.

Late Registration

(from 1st May 2006)

1,720

 

236

ca.

1,360

 

186 ca.

2,185

 

288 ca.

1,680

 

230 ca.

 

 

Registration Fee includes: bus transfers to UWC on conference days; lunches and coffee on conference days; registration; book of abstracts.

IATIS Membership fees depend on where you live, whether or not you are a student, etc. For info on membership fees and joining IATIS, click here (link opens in a new window).

 

 

Rand

Euro

Conference Dinner (including transport)

320

40 approx.

 

Conversions to Euro assume an exchange rate of 1 Euro = 7.80880 South African Rand; 1 South African Rand (ZAR) = 0.12806 Euro (EUR); Please note that the payment should be made in Rand. See currency converter for the latest exchange rate.

Monday, 18 April 2011 18:54

Workshops

Workshop 1. Subtitling, Training for Trainers

Jorge Días-Cintas (University of Roehampton, U.K.) & Aline Remael (University College Antwerp, Belgium)

Tuesday 11 July 2006, Time:  10:30-14:00, (Venue: GH2)

Workshop 2. NEW VOICES Surgery: Writing successful academic papers

Gabriela Saldanha (Imperial College, London) & Marion Winters (Dublin City University, Ireland)

Tuesday 11 July 2006, Time:  14:15-17:15, (Venue: GH3)

 

Workshop 1. Subtitling, Training for Trainers

Jorge Días-Cintas (University of Roehampton, U.K.) & Aline Remael (University College Antwerp, Belgium)*

Tuesday 11 July 2006, Time:  10:30-14:00, (Venue: GH2)

*Co-authors of Audiovisual translation. Subtitling (forthcoming, St Jerome, Manchester)

Software used: WinCaps

Subtitling is one of the best-known forms of audiovisual translation (AVT) worldwide. It has basically been around since movies started talking and it appears to have a bright future. Not only is it well established in a number of European “subtitling countries” as they are traditionally called, but it is also making inroads in other, traditional “dubbing countries”, and worldwide in countries where new forms of AVT are being developed and explored. Besides television and cinema, DVD and the Internet are also providing new outlets. Subtitling is attractive because it is relatively inexpensive, it allows viewers access to the original film, and can be used to promote language learning and multilingualism.

An increasing number of universities and colleges of higher education are now offering translation programmes with subtitling as an “option” or fully-fledged MA programmes in AVT, including subtitling. The drawback of teaching AVT is that (expensive) specialized software is required. However, many commercial producers of subtitling software offer special packages for education and some simple but quite good programmes can be downloaded from the Internet.

This workshop will take the form of a seminar. It will be taught in a computerlab with WinCaps software and will consist of three parts.

1. Curriculum Development (J. Díaz-Cintas)

First we will look at the requirements for curricula in AVT, especially programmes that include subtitling. What kind of courses need to be taught? How many hours? To what size groups?

2. Teaching Subtitling: Theory & Practice (J. Díaz-Cintas & A. Remael)

In this subsection we will look at the different stages in subtitler training and how they can be tackled in a teaching environment. The material used will be drawn from our book Audiovisual Translation: Subtitling. The following issues will be covered:

2.1 Introduction to subtitling: translation or adaptation?

2.2 The semiotics of subtitling: interaction with the filmic text

2.3 Technical considerations (spatial and temporal dimensions)

2.4 Punctuation and other conventions

2.5 The Linguistics of Subtitling (segmentation, condensation, reformulation)

2.6 Challenging translation issues (cultural references, humour, songs)

2.7 The professional environment

2.8 Useful websites and other sources of information, different software

The participants will be given sample exercises for topics 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 that can easily be multiplied, or reworked with new filmic material for other classes.

3. Evaluating Subtitling (A. Remael)

Evaluation is seen a part of teaching. The evaluation of subtitles and subtitlers involves parameters that are somewhat different from those commonly applied to more “traditional” forms of translation. We will discuss subtitling evaluation as part of the learning process or “formative” evaluation and evaluation as assessment of the final product or “summative” evaluation.

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Workshop 2. NEW VOICES Surgery: Writing successful academic papers

Presenters: Jeremy Munday, Gaby Saldanha & Marion Winters

Panellists: Mona Baker, Carol Maier, Juliane House, Jeremy Munday & Jorge Días-Cintas

Tuesday 11 July 2006, Time:  14:15-17:15, (Venue: GH3)

New researchers often hear that publications are very important for their careers and are therefore keen to start publishing early. However, is any paper better than none? Academic papers are, in a way, the introduction cards of new researchers. The aim of this workshop will be to offer guidelines that will help new researchers plan and write successful academic papers. It will cover several key issues, such as:

  • how to judge when a certain piece of research is ready to be disseminated to a wider audience;

  • how to decide what to include, in terms of background theory as well as data;

  • publishing outlets;

  • strategies for packaging a piece of work in ways that maximize its chances of getting accepted by refereed journals;

  • how to write good abstracts; and

  • tips on English academic writing and publishing conventions.

The workshop will include two introductory talks followed by a hands-on workshop and a panel discussion of key questions arising from the audience.

 

Programme


First talk (approx 30 min):

Speaker: Jeremy Munday

Topic: Writing a successful academic paper


Second talk (approx 30 min):

Speakers: Marion Winters & Gaby Saldanha

Topic: The reviewing and editing process, New Voices as an example

 

Hands-on session (approx. 75 min):

Putting the theory of writing an academic paper into practice


Panel discussion (approx. 45 min): Key questions arising during the workshop

Panellists: Mona Baker, Carol Maier, Juliane House & Jeremy Munday

Chair: Jorge Días-Cintas

 

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Monday, 18 April 2011 18:54

Plenary Sessions

Translation and/as (Re)Contextualization

Jef Verschueren

IPrA Research Center, University of Antwerp, Belgium

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While translation is sometimes thought of (though usually not by professional translators) as an exceptional activity (the province of professionals or those who have similarly acquired the necessary skills), this paper emphasizes its omnipresence. The following quote is the starting point:

“Unlike my parents, I translate not so much to survive in the world around me as to create and illuminate a non-existent one. Fiction is the foreign land of my choosing, the place where I strive to convey and preserve the meaningful. And whether I write as an American or an Indian, about things American or Indian or otherwise, one thing remains constant: I translate, therefore I am.” (Jhumpa Lahiri, “Intimate alienation: Immigrant fiction and translation”, in Rukmini Bhaya Nair (ed.), 2002, Translation, Text and Theory: The Paradigm of India, New Delhi: Sage, p. 120)

Adding to this as a point of theoretical reference the pragmatic notion of variability (i.e. the changeable range of options from which linguistic choices are made when language is used), the paper reviews phenomena such as

  • changes in wording as a message passes through different contexts
  • changes in meaning as the same wording passes through different contexts
  • code-choices in monolingual contexts
  • language-choices in bi-/multilingual contexts

as a continuum of types of and obstacles to ‘translation’. It will be shown that what defines the continuum is a set of (re)contextulaiztaion processes.

The paper concludes with observations on what this perspective implies for typical ‘translation contexts’, focusing in particular on two particularly important or consequential ones: (i) an example of a social-institutional context; (ii) the example of the intertextual flow of information in the international media.

Biographical Sketch

Jef Verschueren received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California at Berkeley. After a long career as a researcher for the Flemish Fund for Scientific Research, he is now Professor of Linguistics at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, where he is currently also Dean of the Faculty of Arts. He is the founder and Secretary General of the International Pragmatics Association (IPrA), and he directs the IPrA Research Center. His main interests are theory formation in linguistic pragmatics (conceived broadly as a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective on language and language use), intercultural and international communication, and language and ideology. In all these areas he has published extensively. Some recent publications include the annually updated Handbook of Pragmatics (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins; first published in 1995, now also available online), Debating Diversity: Analysing the Discourse of Tolerance (London: Routledge, 1998; co-authored with Jan Blommaert), and Understanding Pragmatics (London: Edward Arnold/New York: Oxford University Press, 1999).

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Towards more efficient interpreting in South African courts

Rosemary Moeketsi

University of South Africa

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The severe need to upgrade the interpreting practice in South African urban courts in particular stands at the heart of delivering justice in a country with a history of racial discrimination, inequality and human rights abuse.  The huge post-apartheid migration to ‘attractive’ city life and the influx into Gauteng by citizens and non-citizens alike, exacerbates the problem.

Various inquiries strongly suggest that since the majority of the present court interpreters are Africans, their job has historically acquired a generally low status.  This paper explores, first, the reasons why court interpreting as an art suffers and why the training and support systems are not expeditious, robust and consistently deployed.

The next focus of this paper is on the employment of interpreters as “odd-job persons” - acting as, for example, ersatz lawyers, community helpers, fine collectors and clerks and how this compromises the need for professionalism and neutrality in actual interpreting.

The paper concludes by suggesting certain remedies that could be introduced to render more efficient interpreting. Emphasis is laid on the legal recognition of the interpreting profession, clearer job definitions, efficient management, and training in the utility of African languages for court interactions.

Biographical Sketch

Rosemary M. H. Moeketsi has been employed by the University of South Africa since April 1985. She is the Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, chairs the Faculty Tuition Committee and is also Director of the School of Languages and Literature. The School consists of six departments with 176 personnel and offers tuition from undergraduate to doctorate level in twenty-one languages. Before moving to this management position, Rosemary was Associate Professor in the Department of African Languages where she taught aspects of Linguistics (Sociolinguistics, Discourse Analysis) and Literature.

As part of her Doctoral studies between 1993 and 1997 she investigated the use of (especially African) languages and the role of the court interpreter in the multilingual and multicultural courts of South Africa. From this research came, inter alia a BA in Court Interpreting, an academic programme which has received positive reviews as it serves to address the proper teaching of court interpreters in the country (cf. Diana Eades, 2003: "Participation of second language and second dialect speakers in the legal system" in Annual Review of Applied Linguistics (2003) 23, 113-133). A book, a number of articles and chapters in books, as well as a short story have been published in the fields of Forensic Linguistics and Court Interpreting. She has also participated in conference presentations at home and abroad.

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The person to whom it happened: Current perspectives on the translator as an intervenient being

Carol Maier

Kent State University, USA

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“So they say: ‘This is what happened’; but they do not say what the person was like to whom it happened.” (Martha Ronk, “Vertigo”)

Those lines refer to W. G. Sebald’s Vertigo, but they could easily refer to the translator, a figure that, until recently, has not received from translation scholars the attention that it has been given consistently by creative writers. Although there has been extensive study of the translator’s preparation and practice and ongoing discussion about the nature and necessity of translation, there has not been sustained interest in the translator as an individual nor in the complex effect of translation and continual intervention. Therefore, it is encouraging to see signs of increased interest in the translator and recognition of the influential, often conflictive, even dangerous nature of the profession.

That increased interest is manifested in work by translation scholars on the fictional representation of translators and also in reportage in the Western media and accounts by translators about their experiences working in situations of conflict. Translation scholars have also begun to explore various aspects of translation theory and practice that have direct bearing on the translator as an individual: for example, discussions about the translator’s unconscious, the translating habitus, and narrative theory; the renewed emphasis on ethics, especially in the context of globalization; the implications that changes in translation practice have for pedagogy; the corporeal aspects of translation suggested by the work of neuroscientists and of the writers and translators who have charted translation’s effects on their minds and bodies. In short, translator studies, as I will discuss in my presentation, could be seen as a sub-field of translation studies, if not as a field of study in is own right.

Biographical Sketch

Carol Maier is professor of Spanish at Kent State University, where  she is affiliated with the Institute for Applied Linguistics and serves as graduate coordinator for the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies. Her research interests include translation theory, practice, and pedagogy, and her publications include Between Languages and Cultures: Translation and Cross-Cultural Texts (1995), which she co-edited with Anuradha Dingwaney and a special issue about evaluation that she guest-edited for The Translator (2000). She has published translations of work by Octavio Armand, Rosa Chacel, Severo Sarduy, and María Zambrano, among others. Her current translation projects include work by Margo Glantz and further work with Armand, Chacel, and Sarduy. She is also editing a homage volume to the late Helen R. Lane.

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It may be in the text but is it also in the discourse?

Basil Hatim

University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

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In this paper, a distinction is established between ‘text’ (with a focus on mapping a set of mutually relevant communicative intentions in the service of a particular rhetorical purpose) and ‘discourse’ (where attitudinal, value-laden meanings are negotiated). The distinction is intended to shed light on a situation all too common in translation, namely that of the tendency to create unintended effects (or gloss over intended effects) through preserving textual values simply because they are present in texts (or not heading crucial discourse values just because they are not encoded in the actual text). With examples from English and Arabic political speeches and historical writing, it will be shown that this anomaly has been the source of a great deal of stereotyping and cross-cultural miscommunication. What is or is not in the discourse will also have serious implications for translation strategies such as domestication or foreignization, particularly in working from languages which tend to be more ‘explicative’ and which do not as yet possess a differentiated register or genre repertoire.

Biographical Sketch

Basil Hatim is a translation theorist and a prolific translator both into and out of Arabic. He has lectured widely on issues of discourse and translation at international conferences and universities around the world. He has also published widely on Translation and Text Linguistics. Among the books he has authored are Discourse and the translator (Longman 1990), The Translator as Communicator (Routledge 1997) (both with Ian Mason), Communication Across Cultures (Exeter University Press 1997), Teaching & Researching Translation (Longman 2002) and, with Jeremy Munday, Translation: An Advanced Resource Book (Routlege 2004). At present, he is Professor of English and Translation at the American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (on leave from his original post as Professor of Translation & Linguistics at Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh).

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Translating subalterneity: Yet another role for English in India

Rita Kothari

St Xavier’s College, Ahmedabad, India

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My paper attempts to explore the experience of translation as an activist intervention. This intervention happens to come from a language usually castigated for being hegemonic. English (the language in question) belonged to the white master in the past and is now wielded powerfully by India’s urban elite. It would see on this count an entirely unsuitable language and alien vehicle with which to carry the Dalit (untouchables/scheduled castes/marginalized sections of India) experience of pain. However, the past two decades have witnessed an increasing output of Dalit literature in English translation.

My paper explores the reasons for this phenomenon: what makes Dalit writers want to go into the English language, what relationship does English bear with caste and subalterneity; how does it help/obstruct the desire of India’s oppressed to live a life of dignity and empowerment and what role does English translation play there? What makes multi-national and commercial publisher invest in the publication of Dalit works in English translation? Also, what happens to the English language and its registers when it carries the experience of the working class? Finally, what role do English translations of Dalit works play in bringing home to the readers an India that is not-so-shining (a la BJP slogan “India is shining”), but one in which the very achievement of human dignity is a struggle?

Biographical Sketch

Rita Kothari teaches at St.Xavier's College, Ahmedabad (India), where she also runs a translation research centre. She is an accomplished translator from Gujarati, having published six books in English translation. Her translation of the ground-breaking Dalit novel Angaliyat (The Stepchild, Oxford University Press, 2003), met with much critical acclaim, and was nominated for the Crossword Translation Prize in 2005. Her anthology of modern Gujarati poetry in translation (Modern Gujarati Poetry, Sahitya Akademi, 1998) put the State’s poetry on the national map in India, and her translated collection of Gujarati short stories by women writers is soon to be published by India’s first feminist press, Kali for Women. Kothari also writes extensively on translation studies, social history and communalism in Gujarat. She is the author of one major study of English translation in India (Translating India, St. Jerome, 2003), and her recent work (under consideration with Sage) is a study of the Sindhi community in Gujarat and how their post-partition adjustment has led to their shedding of a pluralistic and sufi identity.

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Southward Ho, Or How to Become a Translator Engagé

in Our Time

LIU Yameng

Fujian Normal University, China

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Considering the key role translation plays in enabling and structuring all cross-cultural interactions, it may not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the world has been translated into what it is now, with an ever worsening asymmetry of relations between the North and the South. This perspective jars us into a frustrating realization that while “decentering” has been a popular slogan for decades, what is being generally practised remains a kind of “centripetal translation.” Paradoxically, however, the same realization also gives concerned translators confidence that they could help reverse the trend with a “centrifugal” kind of translation, by turning their professional attention to the global peripheries and by taking the South as the new point of reference for their practices.

To reorient oneself thus is to stop dabbling in trendy academic or theoretical avant-gardism that never disturbs the powers that be. It is to cease professing a love for difference that sounds hollow to the truly different. And it is to put an end to the practice of a kind of “foreignizing translation” that insidiously re-inscribes the domestic interests of the North. The acid test for a translator engagé in our time is to see if the intercultural representations she offers professionally are informed with a “Southern outlook”.

This criterion demands that the translator devote herself to promoting representational justice for peoples in the South. It requires that she carefully distinguish between a genuine solidarity with and a false empathy for the suffering and the victimized. It asks that she reject homogenizing tendencies in any disguise, devoting herself instead to helping the marginalized languages, cultures and civilizations to protect their endangered identities.

Biographical Sketch

Yameng Liu, formerly an associate professor of rhetoric and English at Carnegie Mellon University in the U.S., is Professor of English at Fujian Normal University in China. He has published articles addressing issues in rhetorical theory and cross-cultural communication, in journals such as Philosophy and Rhetoric, Philosophy East and West, and Argumentation. Among his more recent publications are In Pursuit of Symbolic Power, a major study in Chinese of Western rhetoric, and “Academic Culture of the West and Scholarly Translation in China.” A long-time translator himself, he has been serving as a guest English editor for the Chinese Translators Journal.

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Monday, 18 April 2011 18:53

Conference Programme

 

Programme outline

 

:: Tuesday, 11 July: Pre-conference Workshops

08h30-16h30

Full day tour: The Peninsula (optional)

12h30-16h30

Half day tour: Township Cultural experience (optional)

10h30-14h00

Workshop 1: Training for trainers in subtitling
Presenters: Jorge Díaz-Cintas and Aline Remael
Venue: GH2/video lab

14h00-14h15

Coffee break in student cafeteria (own account)

14h15-17h15

Workshop 2: New Voices: Writing successful academic papers
Presenters: Jeremy Munday, Gaby Saldanha and Marion Winters
Panellists: Mona Baker, Carol Maier, Juliane House, Jeremy Munday and Jorge Díaz Cintas
Venue: GH3

16h00-18h00

Registration: Foyer, GH Lecture Theatres, University of the Western Cape

18h00-20h00

Informal Welcoming Reception: Foyer, GH Lecture Theatres, University of the Western Cape.

Address by the Vice Chancellor, Prof. Brian O’Connell
Venue: GH1

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:: Wednesday, 12 July

Transportation to Conference Venue
Pick-up point from Cape Town Hotels:
Parking area of City Lodge Hotel. Time of departure: 7h30.
Pick-up point From Durbanville guesthouses: Individual minibuses will pick up delegates at 8h00.

08h30-09h00

Registration: Foyer, GH Lecture Theatres, University of the Western Cape

09h00-09h15

Welcome and Announcements:
IATIS President Annie Brisset & Conference Chair, Charlyn Dyers
Venue: GH1

09h15-10h15

Plenary One: Jeff Verschueren (Chair: Aileen Pearson-Evans)
Translation and/as recontextualization
Venue: GH1

10h15-10h45

Coffee Break and opening of Publishers’ Exhibition
Venue: Foyer, GH Lecture Theatres

10h45-13h00

Parallel Sessions and Panels [Wed-1]

>>> Click here for details of parallel sessions and panels

13h00-14h00

Lunch
Venue: Great Hall

14h00-15h00

Plenary Two: Rosemary Moeketsi (Chair: Kim Wallmach)
Towards more effective interpreting in South African courts
Venue: GH1

15h00-17h50

Parallel Sessions and Panels [Wed-2]

>>> Click here for details of parallel sessions and panels

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:: Thursday, 13 July

Transportation to Conference Venue
Pick-up point from Cape Town Hotels:
Parking area of City Lodge Hotel. Time of departure: 7h30.
Pick-up point From Durbanville guesthouses: Individual minibuses will pick up delegates at 8h00.

08h30-09h00

Registration: Foyer, GH Lecture Theatres, University of the Western Cape

09h00-10h00

Plenary Three: Carol Maier (Chair: Stanley Ridge)
The person to whom it happened: Current Perspectives on the translator as an intervenient being
Venue: GH1

10h00-10h30

Coffee Break
Venue: GH Foyer

10h30-12h45

Parallel Sessions and Panels [Thur-1]
>>> Click here for details of parallel sessions and panels

12h45-13h45

Lunch
Venue: Great Hall

13h45-14h45

Plenary Four: Basil Hatim (Chair: Alet Kruger)
It may be in the text but is it also in the discourse?
Venue: GH1

14h50-17h05

Parallel Sessions and Panels [Thur-2]
>>> Click here for details of parallel sessions and panels

17h05-18h15

IATIS General Meeting
Venue: GH1 (Coffee available in foyer)

18h15-19h30

Blaauwklippen Wine Tasting and Multilingual Poetry Performance
Venue: Foyer, Great Hall

(no extra cost)

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:: Friday, 14 July

Transportation to Conference Venue
Pick-up point from Cape Town Hotels:
Parking area of City Lodge Hotel. Time of departure: 7h30.
Pick-up point From Durbanville guesthouses: Individual minibuses will pick up delegates at 8h00.

8h30-9h00

Registration: Foyer, GH Lecture Theatres, University of the Western Cape

9h00-10h00

Plenary Five: Rita Khothari (Chair: Theo Hermans)
Translating subalterneity: Yet another role for English in India
Venue: GH1

10h00-10h30

Coffee Break
Venue: GH Foyer

10h30-12h45

Parallel Sessions and Panels [Fri-1]
>>> Click here for details of parallel sessions and panels

12h45-13h45

Lunch
Venue: Great Hall

13h45-14h45

Plenary Six: Yameng Liu (Chair: Ilse Feinauer)
Southward Ho, or how to become a translator engagé in our time
Venue: GH1

14h45-16h25

Parallel Sessions and Panels [Fri-2]
>>> Click here for details of parallel sessions and panels

16h30-16h45

CONFERENCE CLOSURE
IATIS President Annie Brisset
Venue: GH1

17h00

Bus leaves conference venue for Stellenbosch and conference dinner venue

18h30-22h00

Conference Dinner. Moyo African Restaurant, Spier Wine Farm, Stellenbosch

22h00

Bus leaves conference dinner venue for hotels

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:: Saturday, 15 July

8h30-18h00

Full day tour: The Cape Winelands (optional)

8h30-12h30

Half day tour: The Peninsula (optional)

13h30-17h30

Half day tour: Cape Town Mother City (optional)

Half day tour: Township Cultural Experience (optional)

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:: Sunday, 16 July

8h30-18h00

Full day tour: The Peninsula (optional)

Full day tour: Aquila Game Reserve (optional)

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Monday, 18 April 2011 18:52

Programme Outline

Programme Outline

  • Click here for an updated online version (last update 5 July, 2006).

  • Alternatively, click here for a downloadable version of the full programme in excel format (last update 5 July, 2006).

Plenary sessions abstracts

  • Click here for an updated online version (last update 5 July, 2006).
  • Alternatively, click here for a downloadable version of the plenary sessions abstracts in pdf format (last update 5 July, 2006).

Pre-Conference Workshops abstracts

  • Click here for an updated online version (last update 5 July, 2006).
  • Alternatively, click here for a downloadable version of the pre-Conference Workshops in pdf format (last update 5 July, 2006).

Special panels abstracts

  • Click here for a downloadable version of the special panels abstracts in pdf format (last update 5 July, 2006).

General conference abstracts

 

  • Click here for a downloadable version of the general conference abstracts in pdf format (last update 5 July, 2006).
Monday, 18 April 2011 18:51

Conference Organisers

Conference Organizing Committee

Charlyn Dyers, Chair (University of the Western Cape, South Africa)
Dorothy Kenny, (Dublin City University, Ireland)
Youngmin Kim, (Dongguk University, Korea)
Antjie Krog, (University of the Western Cape, South Africa)
Stanley Ridge, (University of the Western Cape, South Africa).

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Local Organizing Committee

Charlyn Dyers, (University of the Western Cape, SA)
Ilse Feinauer, (University of Stellenbosch, SA)
Judith Inggs, (University of the Witwatersrand, SA)
Alet Kruger, (University of South Africa)
Kim Wallmach, (University of South Africa).

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Conference Advisory Panel

Lynne Bowker, (University of Ottawa, Canada)
Hiroko Cockerill, (University of Queensland, Australia)
Ileana Dimitriu, (University of Kwa Zulu-Nabal)
Paulin Djite, (University of Western Sydney)
Judith Inggs, (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa)
Dorothy Kenny, (Dublin City University, Ireland)
Youngmin Kim, (Dongguk University, Korea)
Alet Kruger, (University of South Africa)
mbulungeni madiba (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
Lolie Makhubu, (Durban Institute of Technology, South Africa)
Libby Meintjes, (University of the Witwatersrand, SA)
John Milton, (University of Sao Paolo, Brazil)
Aileen Pearson-Evans, (Dublin City University, Ireland)
María del Mar Sánchez Ramos, (Dublin City University, Ireland)
Svetlana Terminasova, (Moscow State University, Russia)
Charles Tiayon (University of Buea, Cameroon)
Kim Wallmach, (University of South Africa)

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Monday, 18 April 2011 18:51

Key Dates At A Glance

  • Submission of abstracts: 30th November 2005

  • Submission of panel proposals: 31st October 2005

  • Latest date for official notification of acceptance of papers: 15th January 2006

  • Payment of early registration and accommodation fee: before 30th April 2006

  • Payment of late registration and accommodation fee: from 1st May 2006

  • Notification of interest in day/half-day tour(s): 1st April 2006

  • Booking and payment of day/half-day tour(s): 1st April – 30th June 2006

please note: Papers of participants who have not submitted a registration form and payment by 20th June 2006 will not be included in the final programme

Monday, 18 April 2011 18:50

Second Call for Papers

SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

General Conference

 

extended deadline for receipt of abstracts:

November 30th, 2005


latest date for notification of acceptance of abstracts:

January 15th, 2006

Special Panels

 

extended deadline for proposals for panels:

October 31st 2005

 

deadline for receipt of abstracts for panels:

November 30th 2005

 

Click here for information on panels already accepted, including:

 

< The intercultural workplace

< Beyond the post-conundrum: Intercultural communication in an asymmetrical

world

< The Global Initiative for Local Computing

< Translating/interpreting for/in grassroots movements and NGOs

< Training for the market or educating for society?

< Investigating translation competence from an empirical-experimental perspective

< Material practices of translation

< Translating attitudes and feelings: degrees of intervention

< Translating Children’s Literature: intervention or imposition?

< The Bible and its translations: colonial encounters with the indigenous

< Cultural mediation in the Japanese Context

< Intervention in Audiovisual/Multimedia Translation

 

The conference will also feature a New Voices workshop on writing successful academic papers.

 

 

Presentation and Themes

Translators, interpreters, and other intercultural communicators and commentators are indispensable mediators in processes involving the movement of people, ideas, technologies, and literatures between different places, cultures, languages, and even times. Their role can, however, also be described as one of intervention, which stresses a more-or-less self-conscious commitment to effecting change and determining outcomes in societal, cultural, economic and other encounters. This, the 2nd Conference of the International Association for Translation and Intercultural Studies (IATIS), aims to address issues of intervention in interlingual and intercultural encounters, asking, for example, how such intervention can be conceptualised and enacted? And if, following Hermans (2001), such encounters require the speaking subject to position itself in relation to, and at a critical distance from, a source text, does intervention grow as we take up positions that are in direct opposition to source texts? Or does maintaining the status quo not itself sometimes imply complicity with a position that may change the future for others?

Following the success of its inaugural conference in Seoul in 2004, the International Association for Translation and Intercultural Studies now invites proposals for papers and panels addressing the theme of Intervention in Translation, Interpreting and Intercultural Encounters. The Conference will welcome contributions in areas where the ethical and ideological dimensions of translation, interpreting and other intercultural practices have traditionally been a focus, as well as in areas where these dimensions have been addressed less explicitly, although they are always present. Contributions in the following areas are thus particularly encouraged:

  • Interpreting cultural interfaces

  • Translator and interpreter training

  • Language survival and nation-building/nationalism/transformation

  • Post-colonial acculturation and hybridity

  • The translation of literature (adult and children's) as intervention

  • Oral literary traditions and folklore as intervention

  • Globalisation and localisation in the developed/ing world

  • Interpreting and the authentic voice

  • Interpreting silences

  • Corpus translation/interpreting studies

  • Forensic linguistics

  • Translation technology

  • The crisis of representation in Western theory

Contributions may be approached from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds including, but not restricted to: anthropology, corpus-based studies, cultural studies, gender studies, intercultural studies, interpreting studies, linguistics, literary theory, localisation, media studies, pedagogy, postcolonial studies, pragmatics, sociology, translation technology.

The conference will be held at the University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa and will be truly international in its outlook, while at the same time drawing on South Africa's recent and rich experience of cultural and political transformation.

please note: Abstracts can be sent either to:
< the general conference (at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
< or to individual panels through their Chairs. Click here for more details.

 

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Conference Organizing Committee

charlyn dyers, Chair (University of the Western Cape, South Africa)
dorothy kenny (Dublin City University, Ireland)
youngmin kim (Dongguk University, Korea)
antjie krog (University of the Western Cape, South Africa)
stanley ridge (University of the Western Cape, South Africa).

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Local Organizing Committee

charlyn dyers (University of the Western Cape, SA)
ilse feinauer (University of Stellenbosch, SA)
judith inggs (University of the Witwatersrand, SA)
alet kruger (University of South Africa)
kim wallmach (University of South Africa).

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Conference Advisory Panel

lynne bowker (University of Ottawa, Canada)
hiroko cockerill (University of Queensland, Australia)
Ileana dimitriu (University of Kwa Zulu-Nabal)
p
aulin djite (University of Western Sydney)
judith inggs (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa)
dorothy kenny (Dublin City University, Ireland)
youngmin kim (Dongguk University, Korea)
alet kruger (University of South Africa)
mbulungeni madiba (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
lolie makhubu (Durban Institute of Technology, South Africa)
l
ibby meintjes (University of the Witwatersrand, SA)
john milton (University of Sao Paolo, Brazil)
aileen pearson-evans (Dublin City University, Ireland)
maría del mar sánchez ramos (Dublin City University, Ireland)
svetlana terminasova
(Moscow State University, Russia)
c
harles tiayon (University of Buea, Cameroon)
kim wallmach (University of South Africa)

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Language

The official language of the conference will be English.

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Book Exhibition

A book exhibition will be organised to run concurrently with the conference.  For exhibition space please contact Ilse Feinauer: e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.;  tel. +27218082162; fax + 27218083815.

 

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Invited speakers

 

Basil HATIM (United Arab Emirates)

Basil Hatim is a translation theorist and a prolific translator both into and out of Arabic. He has lectured widely on issues of discourse and translation at international conferences and universities around the world. He has also published widely on Translation and Text Linguistics. Among the books he has authored are Discourse and the translator (Longman 1990), The Translator as Communicator (Routledge 1997) (both with Ian Mason), Communication Across Cultures (Exeter University Press 1997), Teaching & Researching Translation (Longman 2002) and, with Jeremy Munday, Translation: An Advanced Resource Book (Routlege 2004). At present, he is Professor of English and Translation at the American University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (on leave from his original post as Professor of Translation & Linguistics at Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh).

Rita KOTHARI (India)

Rita Kothari teaches at St.Xavier's College, Ahmedabad (India), where she also runs a translation research centre. She is an accomplished translator from Gujarati, having published six books in English translation. Her translation of the ground-breaking Dalit novel Angaliyat (The Stepchild, Oxford University Press, 2003), met with much critical acclaim, and was nominated for the Crossword Translation Prize in 2005. Her anthology of modern Gujarati poetry in translation (Modern Gujarati Poetry, Sahitya Akademi, 1998) put the State’s poetry on the national map in India, and her translated collection of Gujarati short stories by women writers is soon to be published by India’s first feminist press, Kali for Women. Kothari also writes extensively on translation studies, social history and communalism in Gujarat. She is the author of one major study of English translation in India (Translating India, St. Jerome, 2003), and her recent work (under consideration with Sage) is a study of the Sindhi community in Gujarat and how their post-partition adjustment has led to their shedding of a pluralistic and sufi identity.

Yameng LIU (China)

Yameng Liu, formerly an associate professor of rhetoric and English at Carnegie Mellon University in the U.S., is Professor of English at Fujian Normal University in China. He has published articles addressing issues in rhetorical theory and cross-cultural communication, in journals such as Philosophy and Rhetoric, Philosophy East and West, and Argumentation. Among his more recent publications are In Pursuit of Symbolic Power, a major study in Chinese of Western rhetoric, and “Academic Culture of the West and Scholarly Translation in China.” A long-time translator himself, he has been serving as a guest English editor for the Chinese Translators Journal.

Carol MAIER (USA)

Carol Maier is professor of Spanish at Kent State University, where  she is affiliated with the Institute for Applied Linguistics and serves as graduate coordinator for the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies. Her research interests include translation theory, practice, and pedagogy, and her publications include Between Languages and Cultures: Translation and Cross-Cultural Texts (1995), which she co-edited with Anuradha Dingwaney and a special issue about evaluation that she guest-edited for The Translator (2000). She has published translations of work by Octavio Armand, Rosa Chacel, Severo Sarduy, and María Zambrano, among others. Her current translation projects include work by Margo Glantz and further work with Armand, Chacel, and Sarduy. She is also editing a homage volume to the late Helen R. Lane.

Rosemary MOEKETSI (South Africa)

Rosemary M. H. Moeketsi has been employed by the University of South Africa since April 1985. She is the Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, chairs the Faculty Tuition Committee and is also Director of the School of Languages and Literature. The School consists of six departments with 176 personnel and offers tuition from undergraduate to doctorate level in twenty-one languages. Before moving to this management position, Rosemary was Associate Professor in the Department of African Languages where she taught aspects of Linguistics (Sociolinguistics, Discourse Analysis) and Literature.

As part of her Doctoral studies between 1993 and 1997 she investigated the use of (especially African) languages and the role of the court interpreter in the multilingual and multicultural courts of South Africa. From this research came, inter alia a BA in Court Interpreting, an academic programme which has received positive reviews as it serves to address the proper teaching of court interpreters in the country (cf. Diana Eades, 2003: "Participation of second language and second dialect speakers in the legal system" in Annual Review of Applied Linguistics (2003) 23, 113-133). A book, a number of articles and chapters in books, as well as a short story have been published in the fields of Forensic Linguistics and Court Interpreting. She has also participated in conference presentations at home and abroad.

Jef VERSCHUEREN (Belgium)

Jef Verschueren received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of California at Berkeley. After a long career as a researcher for the Flemish Fund for Scientific Research, he is now Professor of Linguistics at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, where he is currently also Dean of the Faculty of Arts. He is the founder and Secretary General of the International Pragmatics Association (IPrA), and he directs the IPrA Research Center. His main interests are theory formation in linguistic pragmatics (conceived broadly as a cognitive, social, and cultural perspective on language and language use), intercultural and international communication, and language and ideology. In all these areas he has published extensively. Some recent publications include the annually updated Handbook of Pragmatics (Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins; first published in 1995, now also available online), Debating Diversity: Analysing the Discourse of Tolerance (London: Routledge, 1998; co-authored with Jan Blommaert), and Understanding Pragmatics (London: Edward Arnold/New York: Oxford University Press, 1999).

 

 

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Submission of Abstracts to the General Conference

 

Intending participants should send a 300-word abstract of their proposed paper (30 minutes including 10 minutes for questions)

  • either by e-mail to [This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.].

  • or by fax to ++353 1 700 5527 (marked for the attention of Dorothy Kenny)

Extended deadline

for receipt of abstracts: 30 November 2005.

 

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Submission of Proposals for Panels

Panels are groups of papers organised around a particular theme. Proposals for panels should take the form of one or two paragraphs establishing the rationale for a panel, a succinct statement of the aims of the panel, and a list of specific issues that intending contributors might address. Proposals for panels should be sent

  • either by e-mail to [This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.].

  • or by fax to ++353 1 700 5527 (marked for the attention of Dorothy Kenny)

Extended deadline deadline for receipt of panel proposals: 31st October 2005.

 

 

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Key dates

  • Submission of abstracts: 30th November 2005

  • Submission of panel proposals: 31st October 2005

  • Latest date for official notification of acceptance of papers: 15th January 2006

  • Payment of early registration and accommodation fee: before 12th April 2006

  • Payment of late registration and accommodation fee: from 13th April 2006

  • Notification of interest in day/half-day tour(s): 1st April 2006

  • Booking and payment of day/half-day tour(s): 1st April – 30th June 2006

please note: Papers of participants who have not submitted a registration form and payment by 20th June 2006 will not be included in the final programme.

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Monday, 18 April 2011 18:49

Call for Papers

Second Call for papers available here. [released October 2005]

Special Panels (Call for Papers)

 

  • Panel 1: translating/interpreting for/in grassroots movements and ngos
    Chair: Şebnem Susam-Sarajeva, University of Edinburgh
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 2: training for the market or educating for society?
    Chair: John Kearns, Dublin City University
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 3: beyond the post-conundrum: intercultural communication in an asymmetrical world
    Chair: Michael Chapman, University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 4: translating children’s literature: intervention or imposition?
    Chair: Judith Inggs, Translation & Interpreting Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 5: investigating translation competence from an empirical-experimental perspective
    Chair: Fabio Alves, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 6: the global initiative for local computing
    Chair: Reinhard Schäler, University of Limerick
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 7: material practices of translation
    Chairs: Isabel Hofmeyr and Libby Meintjes, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 8: the bible and its translations: colonial encounters with the indigenous
    Chairs: Jaqueline du Toit and Jacobus A Naudé, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
    Call for papers available here.

     

  • Panel 9: translating attitudes and feelings: degrees of intervention
    Chair: Victòria Alsina, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 10: intervention in audiovisual/multimedia translation
    Chairs: Luise von Flotow (University of Ottawa, Canada) and Luis Pérez-González, (University of Manchester, UK)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 11: the intercultural workplace
    Chair: Aileen Pearson-Evans (Dublin City University, Ireland)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 12: cultural mediation in the japanese context
    Chairs Hiroko Cockerill (School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Queensland)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 13: beyond intervention: universals in translation processes
    Chair: Juliane House (University of Hamburg, Germany)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 14: ways of intervention – the question of censorship
    Chair: Elisabeth Gibbels (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 15: transforming higher education: the role of translation and interpreting
    Chair: Mbulungeni Madiba (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 16: when the source text intervenes.  linguistic innovation and its translation
    Chairs: Kathryn Woodham (University of Nottingham, UK) and Chantal Wright (University of East Anglia, UK)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 17: agents and agency of translation
    Chair: John Milton (University of São Paulo, Brazil)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 18: community interpreting. research and applications
    Chairs: Mette Rudvin (University of University of Bologna, Italy), Helen Slatyer (Macquarie University, Australia) and Carmen Valero Garcés (University of Alcalá, Spain)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 19: interpreting the 'rights of others': translation, migration and globalisation
    Chairs: Jan Blommaert (Ghent University, Belgium) and Moira Inghilleri (Goldsmiths College,University of London, UK)
    Call for papers available here.

  • Panel 20: sexualities in translation
    Chair: Christopher Larkosh (University of Connecticut, USA)
    Call for papers available here.

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