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Wednesday, 29 October 2014 20:21

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Monday, 12 May 2014 21:34

Training Events

IATIS Yearbook 2012

This volume presents fresh approaches to the role that translation – in its many forms – plays in enabling and mediating global cultural exchange. As modes of communication and textual production continue to evolve, the field of translation studies has an increasingly important role in exploring the ways in which words, images and performances are translated and reinterpreted in new socio-cultural contexts. The book includes an innovative mix of literary, cultural and intersemiotic perspectives and represents a wide range of languages and cultures. The contributions are all linked by a shared focus on the place of translation in the contemporary world, and the ways in which translation, and the discipline of translation studies, can shed light on questions of inter- and hypertextuality, multimodality and globalization in contemporary cultural production.

house-picWhat Paddington tells us about German v British manners

Are Germans ruder than the British? Are Britons more dishonest than Germans? Fortunately, we don't have to rely on blind prejudice for answers. Serious academic research has been done on both sides of the North Sea.

 

 

There are Britons in Berlin who get taken aback by the directness of Germans. And there are Germans who get really annoyed when Britons (and Americans), in an effort to appear friendly, say things they don't really mean. Some Germans call this "lying".

So, what do the experts say on the matter?

Professor Juliane House, of the University of Hamburg, has studied groups of people interacting in controlled situations, watching with academic rigour how they behave as human guinea-pigs.

27-28 May 2011

Boğaziçi University, Albert Long Hall, Istanbul, Turkey.

August 15 – 19, 2011, Copenhagen Business School

Centre for Research in Translation and Translation Technology (CRITT)

Dalgas Have 15, 2000 Frederiksberg

 

The CBS CRITT centre is offering an international, English-language course on translation process research. This 1st International TPR course will focus on theoretical aspects of process research, on experimental research design and methodology, on data visualization and human translation process modeling, and on qualitative and quantitative data analysis. There will also be frequent opportunities to consider research issues arising in connection with user interaction with language technological tools.

The Fifth Asian Translation Traditions Conference (ATT5-Sharjah) will be organized by and held at the American University of Sharjah (AUS), the United Arab Emirates (UAE), on 27-29 November 2012.

This conference is a sequel to four previous conferences held at AHRB Centre for Asian and African Languages in London, UK, (2004), the Adivasi Academy in Tejgadh, India (2005), Boğaziçi University in Istanbul, Turkey, (2008), and The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, (2010).  Like the previous conferences, ATT5-Sharjah aims to explore the richness and diversity of non-Western discourses and practices of translation.

For more information, see http://www.aus.edu/conferences/att5-sharjah/

Wednesday, 25 May 2011 15:22

Two-Year Postdoc in Translation Studies

The Department of Language Management and Language Practice at the University of the Free State has a possible two-year postdoc of ZAR200 000 per annum to offer in translation studies. Interested candidates who have completed a PhD during the past ten years can send their CV to Kobus Marais at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Preference will be given to African students working on the development of translation studies in Africa, preferably from a sociological or intercultural perspective, but the selection panel may also consider other candidates. The closing date is 11 June. The panel reserves the right not to offer a grant if a suitable candidate is not found.

UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH, FACULTY OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, School of Languages and Area Studies

Closing date: 27 May 2011

University of British Columbia, October 3rd 2011

Organizers: Leanne Bablitz, CNERS, Siobhán McElduff, CNERS

Call for Papers: closing date July 15th, 2011. 

What does Rome have to do with Cupertino? Or the bulky and unwieldy technology of the book scroll with the sleekness of the iPad? Although posing the question may seem absurd, the answer is – a great deal. Ancient book scrolls were unrolled at one end and rolled up at the other end as one read; as a result, it was far easier to access the beginning and end of a text than the middle. A similar process occurs when reading texts on a computer screen: unless one knows to search for a particular string of text, the opening and closing sections of a document are the easiest portions to access. What will this mean for processes of reading and translating, especially in societies that do not stress memorization? What will it mean for scholarship and citation processes? This symposium will investigate how we, as readers and translators, process information, exploring how ancient processes of reading and translation can inform the modern – and vice versa.

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