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Sunday, 08 September 2013 14:38

IATIS Yearbook 2013

For the first time in English, Anthony Cordingley brings together scholars from around the world to focus on self-translation and its practitioners. The self-translator challenges concepts of originality, fidelity and also of invisibility as well as the conventional binary opposition of source and target texts. The essays in this volume draw on a range of disciplines, including Cultural Studies, Sociology, History, Psychoanalysis and Postcolonial Studies, to illuminate a hitherto neglected aspect of Translation Studies.




Introduction: Self-translation, going global

Anthony Cordingley

PART ONE Self-translation and literary history


1. The self-translator as rewriter 

Susan Bassnett

2. On mirrors, dynamics and self-translations

Julio-César Santoyo

3. History and the self-translator

Jan Hokenson

PART TWO Interdisciplinary perspectives: sociology, psychoanalysis, philosophy


4. A sociological glance at self-translation and self-translators

Rainier Grutman

5. The passion of self-translation: A masocritical perspective

Anthony Cordingley

6. Translating philosophy: Vilém Flusser’s practice of multiple self-translation

Rainer Guldin

PART THREE Postcolonial perspectives


7. Translated otherness, self-translated in-betweenness: Hybridity as medium versus hybridity as object in Anglophone African writing

Susanne Klinger

8. ‘Why bother with the original?’ Self-translation and Scottish Gaelic poetry

Corinna Krause

9. Indigenization and opacity: Self-translation in the Okinawan/Ryūkyūan writings of Takara Ben and Medoruma Shun

Mark Gibeau

PART FOUR Cosmopolitan identities/texts

10. Self-translation, self-reflection, self-derision: Samuel Beckett’s bilingual humour

Will Noonan

11. Writing in translation: A new self in a second language

Elin-Maria Evangelista

12. Self-translation as broken narrativity: Towards an understanding of the self’s multilingual dialogue

Aurelia Klimkiewicz


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