Joseph Lambert

PhD student in Translation Studies at the University of Hull, UK.

Friday, 12 April 2019 13:09

IATIS Summer Reading Collection

Summer reading

Friday 26th April 2019, Manchester Metropolitan University, Geoffrey Manton building, LT3

£15 registration (£10 Postgraduates), includes refreshments and lunch

University of Tartu, Estonia

7-8 May 2019

The Jiao Tong Baker Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies is pleased to announce that the winner of the 2019 Martha Cheung Award is Dr. Yasmin Moll of the University of Michigan, USA, for her article entitled ‘Subtitling Islam: Translation, Mediation, Critique’, published in Public Culture 29/2 (2017).

Dr. Moll’s study examines subtitling practices at Iqraa, a satellite television channel designed to promote Islamic da’wa (‘outreach’ or ‘preaching’) within both Muslim-majority and Muslim-minority societies. It argues that the subtitlers see their task as twofold: to act as ‘cultural mediators’ responsible for countering perceived Western stereotypes about Muslims on the one hand, and, on the other, to transmit as ‘preachers by proxy’ correct and relevant religious knowledge to viewers when, at times, the Arab preachers they subtitle fail to do so. These translators feel authorized to contest through subtitles both external representations of Islam and internal interpretations of divine intent. Their acts of translation, and their internal debate at Iqraa, exceed the familiar Euro-American antimony of fidelity and betrayal. The article is based on extensive fieldwork and draws on and contributes to scholarship in media studies, translation studies and cultural anthropology. It demonstrates a fine-grained attention both to the actual and contingent ways in which subtitles are created and to the different motivations behind their creation, showing how translation on Islamic television is entwined in multiple stakes at multiple scales, whether those are aspirations for professional excellence, desires for a more just geopolitical order, or longing for divine salvation.

Runners up

Two further submissions have been deemed by reviewers and the Award Committee to be of outstanding quality and therefore deserve mention as runners up. In alphabetical order, the runners up are Dr. Qian Menghan of Beijing International Studies University, China and Dr. Wine Tesseur of the University of Reading, UK.

The article by Dr. Qian, entitled ‘Penguin Classics and the Canonization of Chinese Literature in English Translation’, appeared in Translation and Literature 26/3 (2017). It examines the process by which translated Chinese literature becomes canonical in the anglophone literary system. Adopting a notion of the ‘classic’ that takes into account both essentialist and historical stances, it examines Penguin Classics originally written in Chinese from the perspective of choice of texts, translations, publishing, and literary-critical reception. It addresses the questions: What is the current canon of Chinese literature in English translation? What are the forces that certify some Chinese works as deserving canonical status in anglophone culture? And what consequences might the politics of recognition have for the understanding of world literature at large? The author argues that translated texts are valorized by multiple mediators within institutional frameworks, and the status they are accorded reflects the structures of the global literary economy.

Dr. Tesseur’s article, entitled ‘Incorporating Translation in Sociolinguistic Research: Translation Policy in an International Non-governmental Organisation’, was published in the Journal of Sociolinguistics 21/5 (2017). It explores aspects of translation, multilingualism and language policy in the field of transnational civil society. By focusing on translation policies at Amnesty International, an international non‐governmental organisation that performs a key role in global governance, the article seeks to contribute to a globalisation‐sensitive sociolinguistics. It argues that combining a sociolinguistic approach – more precisely linguistic ethnography – with translation studies leads to an increased understanding of the language practices under study. The article also calls for more interdisciplinary research, arguing that there is space for sociolinguistics and translation studies to contribute to research in international relations and development studies by highlighting the role of multilingualism and challenging the traditionally powerful position of English in transnational civil society.


Dr. Yasmin Moll (The University of Michigan, USA)

Moll, Yasmin (2017) ‘Subtitling Islam: Translation, Mediation, Critique’, Public Culture 29(2): 333-361.

Abstract: Egyptian translators working at Iqraa—the world’s first Islamic television channel—use a variety of strategies in subtitling Arabic-language preaching programs into English. These translators see their task as twofold: to act as “cultural mediators” responsible for countering perceived Western stereotypes about Muslims, on the one hand, and, on the other, to transmit as “preachers by proxy” correct and relevant religious knowledge to viewers when, at times, the Arab preachers they subtitle fail to do so. Translators feel authorized to contest through subtitles both external representations of Islam and internal interpretations of divine intent. Far from being just exercises in interlingual equivalence, subtitling is a form of moral critique motivated by both postcolonial and theological imperatives. These acts of translation, and their internal debate at Iqraa, exceed the familiar Euro-American antimony of fidelity and betrayal.

Available open access for one year at https://read.dukeupress.edu/public-culture/article/29/2%20(82)/333/31094/Subtitling-Islam-Translation-Mediation-Critique

 

Dr. Qian Menghan (Beijing International Studies University, China)

Qian, Menghan (2017) ‘Penguin Classics and the Canonization of Chinese Literature in English Translation’, Translation and Literature 26(3): 295-316.

Abstract: This article examines the process by which translated Chinese literature becomes ‘canonical’ in the anglophone literary system. Adopting a notion of the ‘classic’ that takes into account both essentialist and historical stances, it conducts a study of Penguin Classics originally written in Chinese under the aspects of choice of texts, translations, publishing, and literary-critical reception. It addresses the questions: What is the current canon of Chinese literature in English translation? What are the forces that certify some Chinese works as deserving canonical status in anglophone culture? And what consequences might the politics of recognition have for the understanding of world literature at large? It argues that translated texts are valorized by multiple mediators within institutional frameworks, and the status they are accorded reflects the structures of the global literary economy.

Available at: https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/abs/10.3366/tal.2017.0302

 

Dr. Wine Tesseur (The University of Reading, UK)

Tesseur, Wine (2017) ‘Incorporating Translation in Sociolinguistic Research: Translation Policy in an International Non-governmental Organisation’, Journal of Sociolinguistics 21(5)

Abstract: This article explores aspects of translation, multilingualism and language policy in the field of transnational civil society. By focusing on translation policies at Amnesty International, an international non‐governmental organisation that performs a key role in global governance, this article seeks to contribute to a globalisation‐sensitive sociolinguistics. It argues that combining a sociolinguistic approach – more precisely linguistic ethnography – with translation studies leads to an increased understanding of the language practices under study. Furthermore, the article calls for more interdisciplinary research, stating that there is space for sociolinguistics and translation studies to contribute to research in international relations and development studies by highlighting the role of multilingualism and challenging the traditionally powerful position of English in transnational civil society.

Available at: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/josl.12245

 

15 May, 6-8pm, Language Resources Centre Room K-1.07.2, Level -1 (i.e. BASEMENT level), King’s building, King’s College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS

The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Cross-linguistic and corpus-based Translation Studies - Challenges and Implications

3 April 2019

Uzbekistan State University of World Languages

29th-30th May 2019, Swansea University

Professor Susan Bassnett, Universities of Glasgow and Warwick

Wednesday 3rd April 2019, 5–6.30pm

Eliot Conference Room, Canham Turner, University of Hull

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