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Inttranews

The Regional Committee are pleased to announce a recent initiative whereby Routledge and IATIS will co-fund two regional workshops each academic year. A maximum of £750 is available for each workshop. Workshop organizers are expected to source further funding from local funding bodies and organizations to meet the total cost of the workshop if required.

http://www.univ-artois.fr/Actualites/Agenda/Colloque-Au-coeur-de-la-traductologie-hommage-a-Michel-Ballard

Achieving Consilience. Translation Theories and Practice

Essay collection dased on Master's Dissertations by Commentary which have been expanded to become research papers and students' defenses of their translation choices.

Edited by

David Charlston, Elena Davitti, Rebecca Johnson, Gloria Lee, Sally Marshall, Ruth Abou Rached, M. Zain Sulaiman

 

Book Reviews Editor: Gloria Lee

Abstracts Editors: Rebecca Johnson, Ruth Abou Rached

 

Special Issue: ‘Translating Cultures: Translation as a Tool for Inclusion/Exclusion in a Multicultural Society’, University of Westminster (2014), Proceedings

Guest-edited by

Daniel Tomozeiu

CfP: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

TRANSLATION AND THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
University of Westminster, London
7-8 October 2016

Jointly organised by:

Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Westminster

School of Foreign Languages and Cultures, Nanjing Normal University

Guangdong University of Foreign Studies

 

As the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) refers to the ‘interface between creativity, culture, economics and technology in a contemporary world dominated by images, sounds, texts and symbols’, the creative industries are becoming increasingly central to policies intended to stimulate economic growth and foster cultural diversity.

The demand for the creative sector to fulfil this double function is growing, and so is the need to foster critical and productive thinking on the precepts, prerequisites and performance(s) of such duality. This conference aims to address this issue through the prism of translation, itself an activity often caught in a conceptual double-bind of creativity on the one hand and (re-)productivity on the other.

Translation, as a professional (and thus value-generating) mediation activity across linguistic, cultural, and conceptual boundaries (and indeed as a NACE-designated creative industry in its own right) not only plays a crucial role in contributing to and indeed shaping both global and local creative economies, but is also itself increasingly shaped by the emerging ‘creative economy’ paradigm.

We invite papers from both academics and industry practitioners that reflect on the relationship between the creative industries and translation in both theory and practice. Themes to be explored may include, but are not limited to:

Images, sounds, texts and symbols: translating the language(s) of the creative industries Translating values and the value(s) of translationCreativity and translational commerce Translation and cultural/social/economic transformationTranslation between globalization and localizationTranscreation – new kid on the block or the emperor’s new clothes?Technology, translation, and the (not so) new media

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers in English on these and related topics.

Please send your 300-word abstract plus 50-word bio note to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 14 June 2016.

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/call-for-papers-translation-and-the-creative-industries-international-conference

Call for Abstracts: IPCITI 2016

The Centre for Translation and Textual Studies (Dublin City University) is delighted to announce that it will host the IPCITI 2016 conference on the 12th and 13th of December 2016.

The Call for Abstracts is now open, with a deadline of June 15th.

The Keynote Speaker is Dublin City University's very own Prof. Michael Cronin.

The conference will be preceded by a workshop on presenting research orally, run by Prof. Jenny Williams and Dr. Marion Winters.

All details on the conference are available at the IPCITI website

Join our webinar on 13 April 1.30pm - 2.00 pm BST

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1132839298031323650

This short online session covers our Specialised Translation & Translation and Interpreting postgraduate degrees. Delivered by course leaders, the session is a great opportunity to find out more about the courses and career options, and covers questions around the admissions process plus a live Q&A session.

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the 8th Asian Translation Traditions Conference. SOAS, University of London will host this event on 5-7 July 2017. The conference theme is:

Conflicting Ideologies and Cultural Mediation

– Hearing, Interpreting, Translating Global Voices

Translation and Religion: Interrogating Concepts, Methods and Practices

University of Edinburgh, 1-3 September 2016

 

What is the relationship between ‘translation’ and ‘religion’? While all ‘religions’ travel and engage in translation of one kind or another, what gets translated? How do the different components of what is currently understood as ‘religion’—texts, practices, experiences, inner faith or belief systems—translate differently? How can we analyze such commonly held beliefs that some languages simply are sacred and should not be translated? And what are the implications of such questions for understanding religious conversion? What can translation concepts and methods tell us about the way religions and the study of religions are constructed?

 

Call for Papers, Abstracts Submission Deadline-April 15, 2016

What is the relationship between ‘translation’ and ‘religion’? While all ‘religions’ travel and engage in translation of one kind or another, what gets translated? How do the different components of what is currently understood as ‘religion’—texts, practices, experiences, inner faith or belief systems—translate differently? How can we analyze such commonly held beliefs that some languages simply are sacred and should not be translated? And what are the implications of such questions for understanding religious conversion? What can translation concepts and methods tell us about the way religions and the study of religions are constructed?

 

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